Academic journal article Journal of Multidisciplinary Research

Angel Investing: The Gust Guide to Making Money and Having Fun Investing in Startups

Academic journal article Journal of Multidisciplinary Research

Angel Investing: The Gust Guide to Making Money and Having Fun Investing in Startups

Article excerpt

Book Details Rose, D. S. (2014). Angel investing: The Gust guide to making money and having fun investing in startups. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 271 pages, $35, hardcover, ISBN 978-1-118-85825-7.

Synopsis and Evaluation

Described by Business Week as a "world conquering entrepreneur," David S. Rose is a leading expert and visionary on the topics of future technology, venture investing, and entrepreneurship. In his book Angel Investing: The Gust Guide to Making Money and Having Fun Investing in Startups, he discusses the human and financial rewards of being an angel investor and proceeds to take the reader step by step through the basics of angel investing in a simple, non-intimidating manner.

Until recently, angel investing has been available only to an exclusive club of high-stakes players who love risk and the excitement of investing in promising new ventures. Angel investing now has entered the mainstream with crowdfunding and lower investment requirements, thanks to the JOBS Act, or Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, of 2012. In the U.S. alone, investing in startups has exploded into a more than $20 billion-per-year activity over the past decade. Millions of people are looking to see how they can get involved as investors, and there's no better place to start than by reading this comprehensive book.

The author shares anecdotal wisdom, actual cases, and great technical advice while he effectively demystifies investing with vitally important guidelines. He covers a range of topics, such as how to find opportunities and perform due diligence as well as decrease risk and make money while having fun. He even provides helpful templates of valuation and term sheets, a glossary, and a list of valuable resources for angel investing. The book is useful not only for investors but also for founders, entrepreneurs, and supporting organizations.

But being an angel is not for everyone, Rose admits (pp. 12-13). To be successful and better enjoy the experience, one has to have such personal characteristics as a long-term view measured in years; the ability to tolerate losses, risk, and failure; an even temperament; and a general love and respect for entrepreneurs. He goes on to say that being an angel investor is much like being an entrepreneur-one who is regarded as crazy for having "voluntarily entered into [an] Alice-in-Wonderland world of rollercoaster ups and downs" (p. 13).

Regarding the financial life of a startup, it was interesting to learn that "a majority of companies started in the U.S. begin and end with the first stage: the founders' own money" (p. 53). From there, out of 600,000 total startups, the number of those that are able to get outside funding drops exponentially: from friends and family, only 25%; from angels, only 2.5%; from early-stage venture capital (VC) funds, only 0. …

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