Academic journal article Perspectives in Public Health

Long Distance Travel May Contribute to Antibiotic Resistance

Academic journal article Perspectives in Public Health

Long Distance Travel May Contribute to Antibiotic Resistance

Article excerpt

A recent study published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology, has suggested that long-distance travel may contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem across the world, with many previously reliable drugs now failing to stop infections and the emergence of multiple-resistant strains of bacteria. The cause of the rapid spread in antibiotic resistance has long been attributed to overuse and misuse of antibiotics, but this new research suggests that the increased ease of long-distance travel may be partially to blame.

The study, conducted by Dr Anders Johansson and his team at Umeå University, investigated the gut bacteria of 35 Swedish students who were involved in study abroad programmes. In the study, faecal matter was collected from the students before and after travel to India and Central Africa. Metagenomic sequencing was then used to assess the abundance of more than 300 antibiotic resistance genes. …

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