Academic journal article South Carolina Historical Magazine

Creating and Contesting Carolina: Proprietary Era Histories

Academic journal article South Carolina Historical Magazine

Creating and Contesting Carolina: Proprietary Era Histories

Article excerpt

Creating and Contesting Carolina: Proprietary Era Histories. Edited by Michelle LeMaster and Bradford J. Wood. Carolina Lowcountry and the Atlantic World. (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2013. Pp. xvi, 382; $59.95, hardcover; $59.95, e-book.)

Creating and Contesting Carolina is an edited collection of essays that explores how three major groups of people-European colonists, Native Americans, and enslaved Africans-participated in the turbulent events and challenging circumstances of the early Carolina period. Aware of the fluid and diverse nature of the population of this region, editors Michelle LeMaster and Bradford J. Wood chose essays that offer fresh perspectives on the physical, cultural, and intellectual conflicts that defined their subjects' shared experiences. The contributors incorporate methodologies ranging from ethno-history and gender theories to spatial and emigration history, and their work connects the four major events of the time and place-the Tuscarora War, Cary's Rebellion, the Yamasee War, and revolts against the Lords Proprietors.

Part 1 examines the source of tensions in Carolina. S. Max Edelson's important contribution, "Defining Carolina," dedicates most attention to the mapping and changing geographic understanding of South Carolina. John Lawson's seminal A New Voyage to Carolina is only briefly mentioned, and there is no discussion of the Carolina-Virginia border conflict that eventually resulted in Edward Moseley's 1733 map. Justin Roberts and Ian Beamish's article on Barbadians in proprietary Carolina successfully links European affairs with Barbadian settlers as they migrated to the mainland and influenced Carolinian society. Eric E. Bowne's chapter on Henry Woodward, though well written and informative regarding an oft-overlooked founder of Carolina, fails to acknowledge the works of those who tackled this topic in previous research. Effie Leland Wilder's Henry Woodward, Forgotten Man of American History (1970) is an example of the literature that Bowne neglected, and there are effective treatments of Woodward in dissertations by more recent scholars.

Part 2 approaches violence and conflict from various perspectives. Jessica Stem's article on economics and regulation of the Indian trade reveals disagreements among the colonists as well as emerging disputes involving the English and neighboring European and native peoples. Matthew Jennings undertakes an examination of violence between the British, natives, and Africans, exploring wars and slave unrest in the Carolina region. Rather than focusing on the actual fighting, Stephen Feeley examines the Tuscarora War through its context, causes, and goals. He echoes the causality arguments voiced in several new publications commemorating the three hundredth anniversary of the uprising. However, Feeley's examination of the treaties between natives and newcomers before and after the hostilities makes his interpretation unique. LeMaster's essay provides a different approach to the regional conflicts, using ideas of masculinity to understand English and native participation in frontier military engagements. She argues that the heightened level of violence from slave raids and colonial wars shaped parallel, yet culturally distinctive, constructions of manhood. One of the editors' objectives for the collection was giving voice to the different groups in Carolina, including the natives. James Taylor Carson accomplishes this in "Histories of the 'Tuscarora War. …

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