Academic journal article Library Philosophy and Practice

Managing Metadata Interoperability within Audio Preservation Framework: Integrating the Metadata Encoding & Transmission Standard (METS) and Multichannel Source Material into Digital Library Audio Collections

Academic journal article Library Philosophy and Practice

Managing Metadata Interoperability within Audio Preservation Framework: Integrating the Metadata Encoding & Transmission Standard (METS) and Multichannel Source Material into Digital Library Audio Collections

Article excerpt

As data consumers become more information literate and savvy, their expectations for value added content has motivated libraries and archives to provide customers with information more dynamically. One way this has been accomplished is by providing an assortment of hypermedia content and services electronically; including finding aids, digital images, video, and sound recordings. These digital libraries over time make up the collective charged with preserving a diverse array audio recorded histories; some examples include oral histories, music productions and performances, and broadcast. This collective includes content creators, publishers, private collectors, libraries and archives and may represent academic and commercial interest. Academic libraries and archives have been digitizing their music collections to aid music instruction and as a strategy towards audio preservation (Fenske & Dunn, 1996; Dunn & Isaacson, 2002; Indiana University; 2008; Maple & Henderson, 2000). Commercial interest and projects aim at building digital music libraries and services for profit (Davidson, 2001; Griscom, 2003). The common theme that unifies both public and private information organizations lies in the necessity to manage audio assets while providing resource discovery to customers. These tasks are accomplished through the creation, implementation, and exchange of various types of descriptive, structural, and administrative metadata.

This study investigates the management and interoperability of metadata within audio preservation frameworks. With the intention to harvest all descriptors contained in multichannel audio material semantically linked to bibliographic records, authority files, and other associated digital objects; the researcher attempt to incorporate XML, Dublin Core syntax, and the Metadata Encoding & Transmission Standard as a digital carrier to express stereophonic, multichannel source material, and related objects for ingestion into a digital library audio collection.

Further research in bibliographic description, its semantic relationship between audio events and associative derivatives is warranted by the commonalty associated with risk management and the long term preservation of historic audio documents. Many information organizations have been increasingly faced with deteriorating sound objects and immediate actions are necessary to ensure future rendering. Quality digitization has proven to aid in preservation, but no evidence supports the notion that digitization alone is appropriate for audio preservation. To ensure the continued accessibility and validation of signifigent audio objects, special attention is needed to document its history, technical specifications, along with access through bibliographic control.

We will begin with an overview of the two primary digital carriers used during this project (BWF and METS); followed by a literature review covering sound preservation assessment, associated risk involved with audio preservation, discussions on the ethics associated with sound preservation, and conclude the review with a brief discussion on current findings and gaps in audio preservation frameworks. Methods used for this study and outcomes will be presented, and a discussion on challenges encountered and ideas about future research will be shared.

Context and Description

In order to execute this project, the need for two distinctive data carriers will be used to express audio content, its bibliographic information, and the semantic relationship between items contained in the carrier. They are the Broadcast Wave Format and the Metadata Encoding Transmission Standard.

Broadcast Wave Format (BWF)

The Broadcast Wave Format (.BWF) is an extension of the .wav file extension that contains a limited number of core metadata elements essential for broadcast and archival actions. The specification was first introduced in 1997 as EBU Tech 3285 (EDU, 2011). It is based on the Resource Interchange File Format, developed by Microsoft for use with the Windows graphical user interface (Microsoft, 1994). …

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