Academic journal article Library Philosophy and Practice

Mentoring in Libraries and Information Organisation, the Catalogue Librarian Perspectives

Academic journal article Library Philosophy and Practice

Mentoring in Libraries and Information Organisation, the Catalogue Librarian Perspectives

Article excerpt

INTRODUCTION

Career and professional developments vary with the individual practitioners and the day to day challenges of fulfilling core responsibilities. Librarians recognise the importance of career development for achieving both personal and professional goals as well as the contributions to the success of libraries in which they work (Martorana et.al, 2004). Therefore, they have developed different on-the-job training models suitable to effectively nurture professional development. Some commonly used Continuing Professional Development (CPD) models are workshops, seminars, conferences, professional institutes, one-on-one training, job exchanges, coaching, mentoring and self-directed study (Trainer, 1989). Many of these programmes deserve greater attention in developing countries such as Nigeria. Mentoring as a CPD programme for librarians in the university libraries has received little attention. Researchers have thus suggested mentoring for the purpose of assessing potential career directions, setting long term goals and enhancing leadership skills (Martorana, 2004). Besides, most of the evaluation studies on librarianship have focused on users' services, facilities and job satisfaction directed at specific objectives. The assessment of information organisation and database managers is essential and complementary to human resource training because they sustain effective resource organisation and retrievals in the library systems. Few studies have examined and evaluated the perception of cataloguer librarians on the use mentoring in libraries. Therefore, this study presents complete survey on the opinions of catalogue librarians on the use of mentoring in Nigerian academic libraries. In addition to an earlier exploratory study published by the authors, this study presents a more comprehensive data from a larger number of university libraries. The paper has broad discussions. The survey re-validates preliminary study and presents additional findings that may be of benefit to the professionals in developing countries. The research questions focus on the state of mentoring in Nigerian universities libraries; a) Do catalogue librarians in Nigerian university libraries practise mentoring? b) Which mentoring programmes are practiced by catalogue librarians in Nigerian university libraries? and c) What are the assessments of catalogue librarians' mentoring programmes in Nigerian university libraries?

LITERATURE

Mentoring helps mentees to improve particular career areas and explore their potential in development areas yet untapped as well as acquaint them with the organisation if newly hired (Triple Creek, 2009). Mentoring has been acknowledged orient younger librarians in the field as well as address diverse questions of mid-career librarians (Martorana et.al, 2004). A study on the effect of coaching and mentoring on librarians in Makerere University, East Africa by Nassali (2009) reveals that through guidance over procedural obstacles and challenges, new librarians' opinion changed from perceiving LIS as desert profession to seeing it as more challenging. The respondents afterwards developed love for the profession and became proud librarians.

Mentoring has been affirmed to challenge mentees' thinking, increase selfawareness, improve mentees' ability to create relationships which sustain business, and nurture an independent and confident spirit (Clutterbuck & Abbott, 2009). It is therefore significant to explore the mentoring opinions of cataloguers for development. Supporting mentoring needs for cataloguers is also borne of the fact that student's and employer's expectation for mastery of technical skill are unmet (Intner, 2002; Hall-Ellis, 2006; Hill & Intner; 2007). As more LIS graduates are being discovered to lack knowledge of even technical terms among others. Partnerships between cataloguers in libraries and LIS educators to mentor in support of cataloguers' skills development and training have been suggested. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.