Academic journal article SA Journal of Industrial Psychology

Leadership Empowering Behaviour, Psychological Empowerment, Organisational Citizenship Behaviours and Turnover Intention in a Manufacturing Division

Academic journal article SA Journal of Industrial Psychology

Leadership Empowering Behaviour, Psychological Empowerment, Organisational Citizenship Behaviours and Turnover Intention in a Manufacturing Division

Article excerpt

Introduction

The concept of positive organisational behaviour and/or positive organisational scholarship has received much attention in recent years (Avey, Hughes, Norman & Luthans, 2008; Cartwright & Cooper, 2014). Positive organisations can be seen as focusing on the creation of overall wellness (Wilson, Dejoy, Vandenberg, Richardson & McGrath, 2004) in an attempt to sustain individual and organisational performance (Cartwright & Cooper, 2014). Components of this paradigm include leadership (Luthans, Youssef, Sweetman & Harmse, 2013; Van Dierendonck & Dijkstra, 2012; Youssef & Luthans, 2012), empowerment (Avey et al. , 2008; Van Dierendonck & Dijkstra, 2012), organisational citizenship (Avey, Luthans & Youssef, 2010; Chiang & Hsieh, 2012; Paillé, 2013) and intention to stay within the organisation (Lam, Chen & Takeuchi, 2009). Research suggests that these components are crucial for developing a competitive edge within the global market (Youssef & Luthans, 2012).

Globalisation presents leaders with unique challenges and opportunities (Van Dierendonck & Dijkstra, 2012; Youssef & Luthans, 2012), which relies on employees' positive attitudes (Lavelle et al., 2009) towards their leaders' behaviour. Stander and Rothmann (2010) found that for South African organisations to cope with everlasting change, employees are required to build new competencies, resources and strategies in order to react proactively to the polarised demands and work roles of the new business environment. Therefore, organisations need to become more innovative in order to cope with various business demands to improve competitiveness (Taplin & Winterton, 2007) through capitalising on employees' intelligence and creative thinking (Birt, Wallis & Winternitz, 2004). Research suggests that leaders who encourage creative thinking stimulate the manifestation of various positive individual and organisational outcomes (Fong & Snape, 2013), which in return cultivates a performance culture (Kontoghiorghes, 2014). This has led to a growing interest in understanding, predicting and developing empowerment and empowering leadership in research and practice (Kontoghiorghes, 2014; Van Dierendonck & Dijkstra, 2012). It is postulated that employees' perceptions of their leaders may influence organisational and individual outcomes.

Kuokkanen and Leino-Kilpi (2000) and Menon (2001) categorise empowerment according to three approaches, namely structural empowerment, psychological empowerment and leadership empowerment. The structural approach involves entrusting power to others through effective listening, providing individuals with conditions to make them feel significant, emphasising teamwork and treating individuals equally, enabling employees throughout organisational ranks (Bish, Kenny & Nay, 2014). When applied to leadership, this approach involves employees' perceptions of their leaders' behaviour that will enable them to participate in a higher level of decision-making, providing them an opportunity to take calculated risks by applying innovative thinking and/or problem-solving (Konczak, Stelly & Trusty, 2000; Spreitzer, 1995; Van Dierendonck & Dijkstra, 2012). Empowering leadership encourages and facilitates employees to lead and manage themselves (Tuckey, Bakker & Dollard, 2012) and can thus be seen as a positive form of leadership.

The psychological approach to empowerment is based on the notion that empowerment relates to the perception of employees and the internal or cognitive processes that occur once structural and/or leadership empowerment has been implemented successfully (Fong & Snape, 2013; Spreitzer, 1995). Fong and Snape (2013) suggest that empowerment could be viewed as a state that comes from within an individual, indicating that empowerment is similar to the concept of intrinsic motivation. Research suggests that empowering employees will result in the experience of positive work-related cognitions, which could result in increased employee satisfaction, loyalty, performance and service delivery (Bartram, Karimi, Leggat, & Stanton, 2014; Stander & Rothmann, 2010), as well as organisational citizenship (Raub & Robert, 2010; Van Dijke, De Cremer, Mayer & Van Quaquebeke, 2012) and willingness to stay with the organisation (Tuckey et al. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.