Academic journal article Journal of Theoretical & Philosophical Criminology

Rethinking Ontology in Criminology: Synopsis of Quantum Holographic Criminology: Paradigm Shift in Criminology, Law and Transformative Justice 1

Academic journal article Journal of Theoretical & Philosophical Criminology

Rethinking Ontology in Criminology: Synopsis of Quantum Holographic Criminology: Paradigm Shift in Criminology, Law and Transformative Justice 1

Article excerpt

Rethinking Ontology in Criminology: Synopsis of Quantum Holographic Criminology: Paradigm Shift in Criminology, Law and Transformative Justice 1

Introduction

This book evolved from my on-going research in postmodern criminology. During my academic career and practical experiences in the field, I have grown continuously skeptical about the core assumptions we take as a given in our construction of reality. During grad school, Richard Quinney's The Social Reality of Crime, was pivotal in my conversion to a more critical criminology approach. In 1988, I was proud to have contributed to the development of the Division on Critical Criminology at the Annual ASC meeting in Chicago by starting a newsletter with Bernard Headley, The Critical Criminologist and subsequently the Journal of Human Justice with Brian MacLean, which further evolved into the Journal of Critical Criminology. Critical criminology has become well established and many of the early forms of academic repression have subsided providing the basis of lively and diverse critical analysis. However, much of critical criminology (and social sciences generally) often rests on core assumptions that need to be re-assessed. Key concepts such as cause, agency, information, language, entities ("objects"), time, and space remain rooted in Newtonian-based physics. Isaac Newton's monumental Principia (1687) certainly was revolutionary thought in physics, as was Albert Einstein's relativity principles (specific, general). But a new wave is afoot. Quantum mechanics, developed in the 1920s challenged much of conventional/classical physics, even as Einstein disagreed with one of its basic tenets in declaring "God does not play dice." Quantum holography theory (hereafter, QH), particularly the work of Dennis Gabor (1946), has extended on quantum theory to suggest that information should be seen as a key concept alongside the more traditional emphasis on force, energy, and matter. In two earlier articles published in JTPC (2011, 2013) we developed the initial approximations of applying QH to criminology. It remains to be seen how receptive contemporary scholars are to revisiting their underlying ontological and epistemological assumptions. Our goal for the book is more limited: not to produce a full-fledged theory of crime, or an alternative operation of law, but rather a suggestive work for paradigm reflection. Thus in the last two substantive chapters presented are some initial forays in applying QH to criminology, law and transformative justice.

It is remarkable that with the incredible advances in quantum and holographic science experienced in the last several decades and the prevalence of wide applications in the media and consumer world that they have not been seriously considered by criminologists in their steadfast insistence on Newtonian-based principles. But, I suppose, we shouldn't be surprised when we consider the entrance of dynamic systems theory (chaos theory) and its minimal engagement in dominant criminology, law, and transformative justice. There has been a wide dissemination of the compelling nature of the peculiarities of quantum science in television science programming, from the possible existence of multiple worlds to the nature of black holes, but yet, reification remains the norm in criminology, law, and even the emerging field of transformative justice.

This book introduces the emerging field of quantum holography and its application to criminology, law and transformative justice. It suggests a paradigm shift with a new ontological basis. Physicists and cosmologists are, and have been for some time, pursuing understandings and integrations of quantum and holography theory. Contemporary criminology is rooted in a Newtonian-based ontology with little mention of the new sciences that have recently developed. Contemporary criminology (and dominant social sciences), has traditionally resisted quantum theory as pertaining only to the atomic and sub-atomic level. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.