Academic journal article Yearbook for Traditional Music

Iran: Musique De L'époque Qajare: Ensemble Delgosha / Music of the Qajar Era: Delgosha Ensemble

Academic journal article Yearbook for Traditional Music

Iran: Musique De L'époque Qajare: Ensemble Delgosha / Music of the Qajar Era: Delgosha Ensemble

Article excerpt

Iran: Musique de l'époque qajare: Ensemble Delgosha / Music of the Qajar Era: Delgosha Ensemble. 2014. INEDIT / Maison des Cultures du Monde W 260149. Recorded by Amir Mardaneh. Annotated by Maryam Gharasou. 28-page booklet with notes in French and English. French translation by Pierre Bois. Colour and b/w photographs, illustrations, reference list. CD, 18 tracks (59:33). Recorded at Studio Delârâm in February 2012.

This CD will increase awareness of some aspects of Persian music of the late Qajar period (1775-1925). The music is arranged by Siamak Jahangiry, who also plays the ney (flute), and is joined by Ariya Piratai on tar (long-necked lute), Elmira Mardaneh on kamanche (spike fiddle), Hamid Khansari on 'ud (short-necked lute), Vahid Fataei on tombak (goblet drum), and Pantea Alvandipour on vocals. The disc contains two suites, both in a typical performance format in which avazes (sections in free rhythm) alternate with zarbis (metrical compositions).

Both suites have cyclical structures. They are respectively organized in avaz-e Afshari and avaz-e Dashti, two prominent modes categorized by Iranian musicians as satellites of dastgah-e Shur. Each suite begins with a pishdaramad (instrumental overture) followed by two chaharmezrabs (instrumental pieces with a regular rhythmic articulation) and two tasnifs (metrical vocal compositions), interspersed with freely rhythmic avazes and solo improvisations. The closing piece of each suite is a reng, a dance-like tune in 6/8 meter.

Iranian musicians have made many attempts to revive the music of the Qajar period in recent years. Recordings produced by the Gramophone Company, as well as theoretical treatises and other writings that shed a better light on performance practices in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, are now available. Musicians have drawn upon these sources to achieve historically informed performances embodying characteristic features of music from different historical periods. Today, many students of Persian music base their interpretations on original sources, rather than solely on the way their teachers interpreted them. …

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