Academic journal article The New Zealand Journal of Music Therapy

Editorial

Academic journal article The New Zealand Journal of Music Therapy

Editorial

Article excerpt

Volume 1 2 of the New Zealand Journal of Music Therapy has a focus on contemporary issues facing New Zealand and international music therapists and includes a rich variety of reflections on research and practice and an original composition of waiata. The two central topics of focus are first: the nature and development of assessment as a key process in music therapists' work, and second: the linking of the 'cultures' which practitioners, participants, researchers, families (whanau) and organisations bring to their encounters with each other. The journal is introduced with a contemporary waiata, composed for the occasion of the Linking Cultures Conference (November 201 3) held at Te KokT, New Zealand School of Music, by Dr. Te Manaaroha Rollo, and gifted to music therapists and the New Zealand School of Music.

Victoria Churchill's rTesearch to develop a new assessment tool for use with people with severe to profound multiple disabilities, in collaboration with supervisor Dr. Katrina McFerran, is a timely development for an area of practice with which music therapy has a long history. Churchill reviews existing assessment schemes in the field over the past 35 years, and observes that music therapy needs more practical research-informed tools for this population.

The following four articles contributing to this edition were developed from presentations to the 201 3 music therapy conference noted above, featuring practice and research on the theme of Linking Cultures: collaborative partnerships in music therapy and related disciplines. The conference focused on cross-cultural collaboration: celebrating the diversity of people, and their practice and research in music therapy and related disciplines. Conference papers reflected on a wide range of disciplinary practices and the articles published here draw from the perspectives of orchestral string playing, speech language therapy, the mental health team in an infant, child and adolescent mental health service, alongside music therapists from Aotearoa, the United States and United Kingdom. …

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