Academic journal article Journal of Developmental Education

Army University in the Making

Academic journal article Journal of Developmental Education

Army University in the Making

Article excerpt

The U.S. Army provides myriad training for the men and women enlisted among its ranks, from officers to new recruits. However, much of the training does not translate into credits that can be transferred to a college program of study. The Army is currently in the early stages of restructuring their internal educational system to address the situation.

The Army University is envisioned to more closely resemble traditional civilian universities and colleges. In order to assist students to receive college credit on the "outside," the Army plans to consolidate the many training and educational programs and make them more flexible and adaptable to nonmilitary venues. Although a few Army institutions operate as traditional universities, offering accredited degrees, a great many more do not. Approximately 70 schools under their jurisdiction that train enlistees from privates to officers and truck drivers to engineers operate in a disconnected system and are mostly unaccredited. The new vice president for learning systems at Army University, Col. Michael Harlan, explains that of training programs run by TRADOC (Training and Doctrine Command), some are offered by "individually owned and operated " bodies within the Army. Therefore curriculum can be updated differently at the various locations. Harlan claims that the plan is not to decrease available schools, but to run them more efficiently. "Really what we will look at is how can we improve the rigor and abilities that are taught to our soldiers?" (para. 5).

Harlan is heading up the cost benefit analysis stage to develop and justify the new Army University structure for approval. The main focus is to address the issue of transferability of TRADOC class credit to usable credits at civilian institutions. …

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