Academic journal article Anglican Theological Review

Preface

Academic journal article Anglican Theological Review

Preface

Article excerpt

This issue of the Anglican Theological Review is an expansion of the 2015 Trinity Institute, with its theme of "Creating Common Good." The conference generated powerful engagement at Trinity Church and online. Taken together, this issue and the conference rep- resent the intellectual depth and practical application that are at the heart of our work at Trinity. Our long partnership with the ATR has been a valuable part of that mission. In order to encourage excellence in the field, Trinity worked with the journal to sponsor an essay competition on the theme of the conference. The writings of the winner, Willis Jenkins, and two runners-up, Scott Bader-Saye and Amaryah Jones-Armstrong, are included here. I want to thank our two theologians in residence, Professor Kathryn Tanner and the Reverend Dr. Sathianathan Clarke, as well as the Right Reverend Dr. Ian Douglas, who guest edited this journal issue.

As the conference delved into "Creating Common Good," I was particularly taken by theologian Douglas Meeks's careful pointing to the architecture and "furniture" of worship: the baptismal font, the lectern, the pulpit, and, of course, the altar. Each had its clear role in reconciling people to God. While social scientists will formulate an array of definitions for what the common good is, and how systems ought to be structured in order for it to be achieved, the most powerful symbol for shared goodness is the eucharistie meal. In the com- munity approach to God's table, we are located in the unfathomable depth of God's reality that is the common good.

Quoted in Tracy Kidder's book Mountains Beyond Mountains, physician and humanitarian Paul Farmer spoke of the Haitian proverb, "God provides everything we need to flourish, but it is up to us to divvy up the loot. " This sentiment fits nicely with eucharistie vitality. In the gifts of grace, mystery, and unity in the broken body, God has provided all we need to flourish. There is no apartness. The "loot" is divvied up in spiritual food equal in its abundance, and abundant in its equal-nm. We are renewed in our faith-the same spirit lives in all of us.

The environment in which we worship of course affects how the Eucharist will bloom into ministry. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.