Academic journal article Journal of Marriage and Family

Familism Values, Family Time, and Mexican-Origin Young Adults' Depressive Symptoms

Academic journal article Journal of Marriage and Family

Familism Values, Family Time, and Mexican-Origin Young Adults' Depressive Symptoms

Article excerpt

Familism values have attracted the attention of family and developmental scholars who study how cultural values, beliefs, and behaviors influence youths' adjustment (Gonzales, Germán, & Fabrett, 2012; Szapocznik, Kurtines, Sanstisteban, & Rio, 1990). Familism refers to individuals' identification with and attachment to family, and it is characterized by a sense of responsibility, loyalty, and solidarity among family members (Sabogal, Marín, Otero-Sabogal, Marín, & Perez-Stable, 1987). Among Latinos, familism is a core cultural value, with research documenting that Latino youth and adults display higher levels of familism values than their European American counterparts do (Hardway & Fuligni, 2006; Sabogal et al., 1987; Telzer & Fuligni, 2009). Familism values are theorized to promote positive development and protect Latino youth from risk during adolescence (Gonzales et al., 2012): Higher familism values predict lower levels of externalizing and internalizing symptoms among Latino youth (Gonzales et al., 2011; Zeiders et al., 2013), and in some instances, they protect youth from risky contexts (Germán, Gonzales, & Dumka, 2009). We know little, however, about the mechanisms that underlie the protective effects of familism values.

Guided by the developmental niche framework (Super & Harkness, 1986), ethnic socialization theories (Knight, Bernal, Garza, Cota, & Ocampo, 1993; Umaña-Taylor, Alfaro, Bámaca, & Guimond, 2009), and cultural theorizing on the behavioral aspects of familism values in Latino families (Calzada, Tamis-LeMonda, & Yoshikawa, 2012; Gonzales et al., 2012), the current study examined how parents' familism values were linked to youths' familism values and family time and, in turn, to youths' adjustment in young adulthood. Specifically, we followed families across an 8-year period to test whether mothers' and fathers' familism values (and the interaction of their values), measured when offspring were in early adolescence, predicted youths' familism values in middle adolescence and, in turn, the proportion of time youth spent in shared activities with family members in late adolescence. Family time in late adolescence was then linked to youths' depressive symptoms in young adulthood. We focused on the largest national-origin group within the U.S. Latino population, Mexican-origin youth (U.S. Census Bureau, 2014), and tested these processes during a developmental period in which youths' cultural values are salient (Knight, Jacobson, Gonzales, Roosa, & Saenz, 2009), youths' family involvement declines (Larson, Richards, Moneta, Holmbeck, & Duckett, 1996), and youths' depressive symptoms increase (Zahn-Waxler, Shirtcliff, & Marceau, 2008). Further, we investigated familism values of multiple family members (i.e., mothers, fathers, adolescents) to understand the unique contributions of members' values to family and developmental processes.

Background

Parents' Familism Values, Youths' Familism Values, and Family Time

Our ideas about the links among parents' familism values, youths' familism values, and family members' time are informed by Super and Harkness's (1986) developmental niche framework and theories of family ethnic socialization (Knight et al., 1993; Umaña-Taylor et al., 2009). A developmental niche refers to the immediate, culturally structured environment in which socialization plays out and includes three components: psychology of the parent, physical and social setting, and cultural customs and interactions. The psychology of the parent encompasses parents' cultural orientations or belief systems and is theorized to drive parenting strategies, both in the immediate context and across development. The physical and social setting includes the larger cultural contexts of youths' daily lives. Along with other socialization agents, parents provide constraints and affordances within these settings, on the basis of their socialization goals. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.