Academic journal article Alcoholism and Psychiatry Research

Schizophrenia, Recent Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment

Academic journal article Alcoholism and Psychiatry Research

Schizophrenia, Recent Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment

Article excerpt

Title: Schizophrenia, Recent Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment Editors: Philip G. Janicak, Stephen R. Marder, Rajiv Tandon, Moris Godman ISBN: 978-1-4939-0655-0 eBook ISBN: 978-1-4939-0656-7 Publisher: Springer, 2014, New York, Heidelberg, Dordrecht, London Number of pages: XII, 331

Schizophrenia is the paradygm in psychiatry; it is both the classic and the most common psychotic disorder, and has been described in all cultures and socioeconomic status group studies. The cause of schizophrenia is not known; it has been the subject of much debate, with various factors proposed and discounted or modified. The language of the medical model is scientific. Such studies suggest that genetics, prenatal development, early environment, neurobiology, neurodevelopmental factors and psychological and social processes all represent important contributory factors. Shizophrenia probably comprises a group of disorders with heterogeneous causes and definitely includes patients whose clinical presentations, treatment responses, and courses of illness are varied.

Although dementia praecox or schizophrenia has been considered an unique disease entity for more than a century, its definitions and boundaries have changed and its precise cause and pathophysiology remain elusive. Despite uncertain validity, the construct of schizophrenia conveys useful clinical and etiopathophysiologic information. Revisions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and the International Classification of Diseases seek to incorporate the new information about schizophrenia and include elimination of subtypes, addition of psychopathological dimensions, elimination of special treatment of Schneiderian "first-rank" symptoms, better delineation of schizoaffective disorders and an addition of the new category of "attenuated psychosis syndrome". …

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