Academic journal article Best Practices in Mental Health

Evaluation: Steps toward Best Practices

Academic journal article Best Practices in Mental Health

Evaluation: Steps toward Best Practices

Article excerpt

The general theme of this issue of Best Practices in Mental Health is evaluation, and the articles illustrate how evaluation advances interventions regardless of the veracity of the research method. That is to say, even when outcomes fail to reach the .05 significance level, the data are still informative with some probative value. Even weak data are better than no data if they inform.

The lead article by Solomon, DeCesaris, Petros, Linz, and Hanrahan evaluates an innovative intervention pursuant to the recovery orientation, audiovideography. Although the results were not significant, they provide a useful point of departure for revising and improving the intervention. This article illustrates that best practices are developed and are not created out of the clear blue sky with a single effort.

The second article by Story, Kirkwood, Parker, and Weller evaluates Better Todays/Better Tomorrows, an intervention for suicidal youth in rural areas where mental health services are few and likely remote. The program is designed to educate adult gatekeepers on screening and responding to suicide. The article evidences an intervention to improve best practices in rural settings.

The third article by Williamson, Major, Ulzen, Rubin, and Fotopoulos evaluates residents' training in an intensive outpatient psychiatric clinic. This piece is particularly relevant to best practices because practitioners must be trained to do best practice, and the outpatient mental health clinic is the ideal setting. Here the evaluation of the training was chiefly accomplished through a focus group.

The fourth article by Khoury and Manuel develops and evaluates the psychometrics of a cultural competence scale for Arab peoples. Cultural competence is foundational to best practice, and this scale will be useful to practitioners working directly with Arab Americans. It will also be useful for practitioners working indirectly with Arabs, such as providers who contend with veteran services and the impact of the current-and seemingly endless-war in the Gulf region, as well as those affected by the backlash of the current refugee challenge in the European Union and here at home. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.