Academic journal article Journal of Business and Entrepreneurship

Transporting Services to the Customer: Exploring User-Generated Content and Entrepreunership

Academic journal article Journal of Business and Entrepreneurship

Transporting Services to the Customer: Exploring User-Generated Content and Entrepreunership

Article excerpt

INTRODUCTION

Entrepreneurship has become an increasingly popular career opportunity among the Millennial generation (Fenn, 2010; Ribitzky, 2011). Growing up hearing the wildly successful stories of entrepreneurs such as Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg, this generation of tech-savvy professionals are inclined to take risks in pursuit of their passions and career aspirations. This large demographic generation (born between 1982-2000) is now entering the workplace and quickly becoming an increasingly influential force impacting career paths and workplace dynamics (Reiser, 2010). Key to addressing this career mindset is consideration of education and its impact on supporting their entrepreneurial success. As such, entrepreneurial education developments and focus involves methods of practice to create and support entrepreneurial mindsets and action (Neck & Greene, 2011).

One skillset often underappreciated among new entrepreneurs is the development of entrepreneurial marketing skills. In fact, recent research suggests that traditional marketing courses would benefit from a more entrepreneurial perspective (Hultman & Hills, 2011). Whether your business concept is grooming pets or developing circuit boards, the ability to market yourself and your organization may determine the success or, unfortunately, the failure of your business. Therefore, marketing skill development is proving to be an important component in the pursuit of entrepreneurship and the evolution of entrepreneurship education. "Selling" your business idea at a business plan competition requires interpersonal communication in order to build relationships with potential investors. Effectively developing your brand image including the development of your website, social media strategies, and press materials often falls into the hands of the entrepreneur themselves. Further, marketing includes the creation and innovation of ideas and disciplined risk-taking opportunities. Studies have found that entrepreneurship education is lacking at all levels including higher education (Regele and Neck, 2012) and developing a theoretical understanding through entrepreneurial marketing may assist in filling this gap (Hultman and Hills, 2011).

Our study explores the growing popularity of mobile businesses or businesses on wheels. This mobile concept of bringing products to consumers has expanded far beyond simple pizza delivery and car window replacement services. Mobile businesses now encompass a wide array of product and service categories including, but not limited to, food trucks, pet grooming, knife sharpening services, grocery delivery, clothing boutiques, salon services, video gaming and even dental care. For example, recently, medical doctors who are registered anesthesiologists have begun to deliver the cure for a hangover. The Hangover Doctor (based in Waikiki, Oahu) provides customers with an intravenous therapy called the Myer's enabling those who overindulged the night before to quickly get back to their daily lives. With prices reaching $349, the mobile hangover cure must uphold an image of professionalism and customer relationship in order to sustain success. This organization's ability to establish a reputable brand perception and credibility among its target consumers greatly impacts business growth and sustainability. As part of the marketing process, the entrepreneurial perspective should be continually evaluated by the business organization (Hultman and Hills, 2011).

The acceptance of mobile truck businesses as a professional business platform stems from the changes in professional business environment. For example, the traditional suit and tie attire may not be the sought after dress code for the upcoming millennial business professional (Reiser, 2010; Ribitsky, 2011). Additionally, climbing the ladder to secure the coveted corner office does not hold the prestige as it formally held in past generations. Technology gurus and app developers working out of the garage and strolling to work in board shorts and flip-flops has become an acceptable level of professionalism is some circles. …

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