Academic journal article Framework

Editorial

Academic journal article Framework

Editorial

Article excerpt

The "spectator's imagination fi lle d the atmosphere with electricity."1 Th is evocative phrase could apply to much of cinema, if not art, but it particularly suits the work in Framework 57.1, illustrating, as it does, the relationship between art and the perception of art. Th e perception of art is part of art's conception, part of its formation.

The issue's three pieces-Brian R. Jacobson's essay "Instructural Affi nity: Film Technology and the Built Environment in New York circa 1900," Sarah O'Brien's essay "Why Look at Dead Animals?," and Deane Williams's interview with Cecile Starr-have interesting and unexpected connections. All three detail, articulately and exuberantly, ways in which a person's experience of fi lm becomes part of fi lm's infl uence on culture. Jacobson argues that the American emerging fi lm industry, on the East Coast, and the rising and falling urban New York cityscape, in the turn of the twentieth century, had an innate symbiosis, something he terms "instructural affi nity," which infl uenced constructions of both of these material and electric architectures. Cecile Starr, not as well known as she should be because she was a vital force in cinema, once said, "I can't imagine how empty my life would have been without fi lm. …

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