Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Entre la Ideologia Y la Compasion: Guerra Y Paz En Cuba, 1895-1903: Testimonios De Los Archivos Vaticanos

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Entre la Ideologia Y la Compasion: Guerra Y Paz En Cuba, 1895-1903: Testimonios De Los Archivos Vaticanos

Article excerpt

Entre la ideologia y la compasion: Guerra y paz en Cuba, 1895-1903: Testimonios de los Archivos Vaticanos. By Manuel P Maza Miquel, SJ. (Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic: Instituto Pedro Francisco Bono. 1997. Pp. 559. $25.00.)

Manuel P Maza Miquel has mined the Vatican Archives for information about the Catholic Church during the transformation of Cuba under three administrations: Spain, the United States, and Cuba. Maza Miquel's detailed history of Cuba's church-state relations under three flags is a significant addition to the historiography of Spain's colonial regime and the early Cuban Republic. An appendix contains copies of twenty-four Vatican documents as well as a list of papal nuncios in Madrid and one for bishops and archbishops of Havana and Santiago de Cuba.

Although Maza Miquel focuses on Cuba from 1895 to 1903, he extensively reviews nineteenth-century developments in Cuba, Spain, and the Vatican. The core of the book, however, concerns the bishop of Havana, Manuel Santander y Frutos, and the archbishop of Santiago de Cuba, Francisco Saenz de Urturi y Crespo, both of whom served during and after the Cuban-Spanish-American War. Prominent Vatican officials featured in the account are Cardinal Mariano Rampolla del Tindaro, the nuncios in Madrid, and Archbishop Placide Chapelle of New Orleans.

Church politics existed at several levels. In the Vatican, Pope Leo XIII sought to build European political support for his efforts to get Italy to return church lands. Thus, the Pope worked to strengthen his ties to Spain and the monarchy; he strongly supported Spain in its colonial wars in Cuba and the Philippines.

Nevertheless, Bishop Santander, who assumed his Havana assignment in 1887, repeatedly challenged Spanish officials and resisted Spanish law that threatened ecclesiastical privileges. On the island divisive church-state issues concerned baptismal certificates, civil marriages, cemeteries, education, and clerical appointments; there were also financial irregularities. …

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