Academic journal article Medium Aevum

Ritterliche Werte Zwischen Tradition Und Transformation: Zur Veranderten Konzeption Von Artusheld Und Artusbof in Strickers 'Daniel Von Dem Bluhendon Tal'

Academic journal article Medium Aevum

Ritterliche Werte Zwischen Tradition Und Transformation: Zur Veranderten Konzeption Von Artusheld Und Artusbof in Strickers 'Daniel Von Dem Bluhendon Tal'

Article excerpt

Regina Pingel, Ritterliche Werte *wischen Tradition und Transformation: Zur veranderten Kongeption von Art/Xwheld und Artushof in Strickers `Daniel von dem Bluhenden Tat, Mikrokosmos 40 (Frankfurt am Main: Lang, 1994). 403 pp. ISBN 3-631-46z 1-4. DM g8.oo.

Stricker's Daniel, an Arthurian romance with no known French source, has for a long time attracted critical attention because of its unique status within German courtly fiction. In her study, Regina Pingel sets out to reassess the chivalric values represented in the text. Her aim is to recapture the contemporary reception of the work and the way in which it would have been seen against the background of the works by Hartmann and Chretien. This methodological aim is ambitious, although Pingel does not discuss the potential difficulties of applying reception theory to medieval works in any detail.

The first chapter considers the presentation of Daniel as an Arthurian protagonist. In a first part, Pingel summarizes the results of recent critical studies on the *se of Daniel as a name, including a long excursus on the figure of Daniel in the Old Testament. Her conclusion that a thirteenthcentury lay audience would have associated the Arthurian knight of the narrative with the virtues of the Old Testament prophet is uncontroversial, but in the context of her stated methodology, it might have been more convincing had the material adduced for such views been derived from contemporary sources rather than general reference to the Old Testament text. Based on studies by Ragotzky, the second part of this chapter argues that Stricker's Daniel inverts the pattern developed by Hartmann in Erec and Iwein, so that it is the Arthurian court rather than the protagonist which experiences a crisis. Nevertheless, the function of such structural adaptation of the double cycle narrative is seen as assuring the approval of the audience by referring back to accepted moral and literary standards.

In the light of this hypothesis, the third chapter sets out how the figure of Daniel differs from Arthurian protagonists in the narratives of Hartmann and Wolfram, focusing on concepts of list, as the distinguishing feature of the new knight, and aventiure. …

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