Academic journal article Journal of the Medical Library Association

National Library of Medicine Response

Academic journal article Journal of the Medical Library Association

National Library of Medicine Response

Article excerpt

In Fiscal Year 2014, the National Library of Medicine (NLM) released more than 981,000 journal citations [1]. Of that total, 94% (926,000) were submitted electronically as eXtended Markup Language (XML) citations by the publisher or a supplier designated by the publisher. The remaining 6% were created by NLM by scanning from the print copy of a journal and using optical character recognition. NLM creates a very small number of missing citations not sent via XML each year. When NLM manually creates a missing citation, we use cut-and-paste mechanisms.

Citation errors can arise most often from two sources: (1) as published incorrectly in the full-text article or (2) as introduced by either the XML supplier (which is the case in the two identified errors in the letter) or by NLM during its processing.

For the former, NLM requires the publication of an erratum notice so that the publication history is transparent for all users. That requires action on the part of the publisher. For example, if an author 's name is misspelled in the full-text article, the journal must issue an erratum notice. This NLM policy is explained in our errata fact sheet [1]. NLM processed over 9,000 published errata during Fiscal Year 2014 [2]. For the latter, NLM will enter the correction in our workflow as soon as it is reported or discovered. For example, if the XML supplier incorrectly sent the last name as the forename and vice versa while the author names are correct in the full-text article, NLM will reverse the name parts once we know about the error. …

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