Academic journal article Perspectives in Public Health

Retirement Villages: Tackling the Loneliness Epidemic?

Academic journal article Perspectives in Public Health

Retirement Villages: Tackling the Loneliness Epidemic?

Article excerpt

New research suggests that pensioners living in special retirement communities are significantly less likely to feel lonely or isolated than those still living in their own homes. As the ageing population becomes increasingly difficult to support, a study by the think-tank of the International Longevity Centre (ILC) suggests that adopting the US model of retirement villages in the United Kingdom can have a major impact in promoting resident's quality of life and reducing feelings of loneliness and isolation.

Other options for alternative retirement accommodation can include shared houses and flats similar to those favoured by young single workers but where residents are matched because of similar interests or hobbies and with care on hand. Other, specific initiatives in the United States have included a retirement complex built on a college campus in Boston, Massachusetts, where elderly residents are encouraged to do at least three hours of classes a week, and in the United Kingdom, new city centre flats in Manchester designed for disabled and vulnerable people, built as part of a new shopping complex. A new retirement community in a rural area in North Yorkshire had become the hub of the village, for people of all ages, with a Post Office, shop, restaurant, hairdresser and hall used for yoga classes and fairs. …

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