Academic journal article Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri

Investigation of the Self-Regulated Learning Strategies of Students from the Faculty of Education Using Ordinal Logistic Regression Analysis

Academic journal article Kuram ve Uygulamada Egitim Bilimleri

Investigation of the Self-Regulated Learning Strategies of Students from the Faculty of Education Using Ordinal Logistic Regression Analysis

Article excerpt

One of the most important targets of education in the developing and changing world is to raise individuals to think, explore, question, produce, decide by themselves, undertake the responsibility of learning, control their learning processes, take part actively in such processes, and have self-confidence in their capabilities and correctly use these capabilities, instead of individuals raised with traditional education involving mechanical learning. In recent years, exploration and understanding of their own learning processes by the students as well as the support given by trainers in learningteaching environments has gained importance with respect to achieving effective learning. It is now well-known that the factors effective for learning are not only cognitive as affective factors also have an important role (Tait-McCutcheon, 2008).

One of the most important factors influencing learning and academic success is the concept of self-regulation. The research on the concept of self-regulation emerged in the mid-1980s to answer the question, "How can students manage their own learning processes?" (Zimmerman, 2001).

There are various definitions of the concept of self-regulation in literature. According to Bandura (1986), who first introduced the concept, self-regulation is the individual playing an effective role in and controlling the learning-teaching process by the identification of learning targets. Zimmerman (1989), who attracted attention with his work on selfregulation, defined this self-regulation as the extent to which the students actively participate in their learning processes with respect to meta-cognition, motivation, and behavior, while Kauffman (2004) defined it as the learner's attempt to control and manage complex learning activities. Pintrich (2000), however, expressed self-regulation as an active and constructive process by which the students identify their learning objectives and regulate their cognition, motivations, and behavior. Considering the definitions of self-regulation, the requirement for students to play an active role in the learning processes emerges as a common point. The individual will become aware of his/her own learning, will establish his/her own control, and will assess himself/herself in processes in which he/she is active. Risemberg and Zimmerman (1992) defined self-regulation as determining objectives, developing strategies to achieve these objectives, controlling the gains of these strategies, and indicating the importance of the utilization of self-regulated learning strategies.

One of the fundamental factors that affects the learning process based on selfregulation is self-regulating strategies. Self-regulation strategies are cognitive strategies such as repetition, interpretation, and organization of the effort spent by the students when they are accomplishing a task in the learning-teaching process (Pintrich & De Groot, 1990). Self-regulation is in a cyclic relationship with a multitude of variables; for example, when the self-efficacy level of the students on a subject increases, it may affect their self-regulation skills on the subject, and using self-regulation strategies may increase their self-efficacies, ensuring more self-regulation. From another perspective, individuals with high academic success may ensure more self-regulation, and individuals who can self-regulate may increase their academic success.

The literature on the subject reports numerous studies that reveal the relationship between the concept of self-regulation and gender (Akkaya, 2012; Alçi & Altun, 2007; Cebesoy, 2013; Çelik Ercoskun & Köse, 2014; Erdogan & Sengül, 2014; Gömleksiz & Demiralp, 2012; Kadioglu, Uzuntiryaki, & Çapa Aydin, 2011; Özkal & Sucuoglu, 2013; Sagirli & Azapagasi, 2009; Üredi & Üredi, 2005; Yüksel, 2013; Zimmerman, Bandura, & Martinez-Ponds, 1992; Zimmerman & Martinez-Pons, 1990), self-efficacy (Israel, 2007; Ocak & Yamaç, 2013; Pintrich, 1999; Pintrich & De Groot, 1990; Virtanen, Nevgi, & Niemi, 2014; Zimmerman & Martinez-Pons, 1990), and academic success (Akkus Ispir, Ay, & Saygi, 2011; Altun, 2005; Altun & Erden, 2013; Arsal; 2009; Bembenutty, 2011; Bono & Bizri, 2014; Cheng, 2011; Duru, Duru, & Balkis, 2014; Malpass, O'Neil, Harold, & Hocevar, 1999; Tekbiyik, Camadan, & Gulay, 2013; Turan & Demirel, 2010; Israel, 2007; Üredi & Üredi, 2005, 2007; Yüksel, 2013). …

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