Academic journal article Researchers World

Energy Concept Development Using the U Slope

Academic journal article Researchers World

Energy Concept Development Using the U Slope

Article excerpt

INTRODUCTION:

Physics is first taught as a elective subject in Malaysian secondary schools in Form 4 (16 years old) and Form 5 (17 years old), to prepare students for the Malaysia Certificate of Education (MCE) Examination (Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia, SPM, in the Malay language) at the end of five years of secondary schooling. Branches of physics that are taught are force, motion, pressure, heat, light, wave, electricity, electromagnet electronic, and radioactive. Each student is expected to master all branches of physics so that they can pursue their studies to the next level. However, in reality, this does not happen. Many of the students consider physics is a difficult subject and not interested in learning. Since 1995, it appears the rules of physics students who excelled in the Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia is very small at 7.7%. According to Salmiza (2014), Malaysian students have an encouraging motivation to study physics, but they consider that physics learning activities in school less interesting and quite boring. Consequently, the Malaysian 60:40 science education policy has not achieved, although the target year should be achieved is in 2010.

Energy is one of the most fundamental and far reaching of all scientific concepts to understanding the biological, chemical, physical and technological world (Driver and Millar, 1986). In physics, energy is usually seen as an abstract accounting principle (Duit, 2014) and all physicists associated energy as a central of physics (Quinn, 2014). It is a quantity denoting a debit and credit balance in nature (Duit, 2014). Basically, different forms of energy are measured in different units because they were discovered and categorized at different times. In Malaysia's society today, we are confronted with a wide range of energy usage issues such as electrical devices, hybrid or traditional car, renewable energy and fossil. We need to understand what energy is and how it can be used wisely to reduce cost, pollution and can create a healthy environment. However, energy means different things to different people and there are a number of varying definitions in everyday context (Gyberg and Lee, 2010). Millar (2014) stated that there are two different ideas about energy: (1) in science, energy is widely being an abstract, mathematical ideas and it is hard to define ?energy' or even to explain clearly what we mean by the word, (2) the word ?energy' is widely used in everyday contexts, including many which appear ?scientific' but with a meaning which is less precise than its scientific meaning, and which differs from it in certain respects.

In a school setting, energy ideas are central to understanding the life, earth, and physical science (HerrmannAbell and DeBoer, 2011). According to the past science education researchers, they have shown that there are serious difficulties in understanding energy and its related concepts among students of all ages (Cheong et al., 2015; Liu and McKeough, 2005; Neumann et al., 2013). Students often do not connect the energy that they learn about in physics class with the energy that they learn about in biology or chemistry (Eiskenkraft et al., 2014). More importantly, students use the term energy in everyday lives well before learning about it in school and come to develop an intuition about it that may or not map onto a scientific view of energ y (Duit, Treagust, and Widodo, 2013). A variety of quantitative and qualitative methods have been employed to identify the misconception of energy (e.g. Dawson-Tunik and Stein, 2004; Neumann et al., 2013).

Based on the TIMSS frameworks (Mullis et al., 2009), the most important concept evaluated in science domain is energy. Notwithstanding, the global demand for energy has risen enormously and our education system is able to compete with other countries that have better achievement in TIMSS . Through the book of Malaysia Education Blueprint 2013-2025, the results of TIMSS become a benchmark for learning mathematics and science for national education development (MOE, 2012). …

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