Academic journal article The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

Teaching the Twentieth Century

Academic journal article The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

Teaching the Twentieth Century

Article excerpt

Friday, 17 July, marked the successful conclusion of the latest of the Society's institutes for teachers. This year, fifteen educators from across the commonwealth participated in a twoweek program, "Virginia in the Twentieth Century." Ronald L. Heinemann, Squires Professor of History at Hampden-Sydney College and author of Harry Byrd of Virginia, served as the lead faculty member. Other lecturers were James Tice Moore of Virginia Commonwealth University, Sandra Gioia Treadway of the Library of Virginia, and Kara Miles Turner of Virginia State University.

Each morning of the institute, the teachers met for breakfast. Next, they spent two hours researching specific topics in the Society's reading room and preparing lesson plans for their students. Lectures, lunch, and discussion of readings followed. Each day concluded with a tour or special program. One afternoon, the teachers talked informally with two Richmond residents who were actively involved in the desegregation of Virginia's schools. Alice Jackson Stuart unsuccessfully tried to break the color barrier at the University of Virginia by applying for admission to the graduate program in English in 1935. Oliver W. Hill, a protege of Thurgood Marshall, argued the Virginia component of the cases consolidated as Brown v. Board of Education.

Participating in the teachers' institute were Amy Bennett (Patrick Henry High School, Ashland), Nicole M. …

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