Academic journal article Journal of the Indian Academy of Applied Psychology

Reducing the Problem Behaviour of Adolescents Abused during Childhood through Technical Eclecticism

Academic journal article Journal of the Indian Academy of Applied Psychology

Reducing the Problem Behaviour of Adolescents Abused during Childhood through Technical Eclecticism

Article excerpt

The World Health Organization (1999) defines child abuse as "all forms of physical and/or emotional ill-treatment, sexual abuse, neglect or negligent treatment or commercial or other exploitation, resulting in actual or potential harm to the child's health, survival, development or dignity in the context of a relationship of responsibility, trust or power" (p. 15). She has given four categories of child abuse. These are - Physical abuse (PA): which results in actual or potential physical harm from an interaction or lack of an interaction, that is reasonably within the control of a parent or a person in a position of responsibility, power or trust; Sexual abuse (SA): is the involvement of a child in a sexual activity that he or she does not comprehend, is unable to give informed consent to, orforwhichthe child is notdevelopmentally prepared and cannot give consent, or that violate the laws or social taboos of society; Emotional abuse (EA): includes the failure to provide a developmental^ appropriate, supportive environment, including the availability of a primary attachment figure, so that the child can develop a stable and full range of emotional and social competencies commensurate with her or his personal potentials and in the context of the society, in which the child dwells; and Neglect (Ne): is the failure to provide for the development of the child in all spheres (health, education, emotional development, nutrition, shelter, and safe living conditions), in the context of resources reasonably available to the family or caretakers and causes or has a high probability of causing harm to the child's health or physical, mental, spiritual, moral, or social development (WHO, 1999, p. 15).

Prevalence of Child Abuse In India

Every fifth child of world lives in India, yet "India has the world's largest number of sexually abused children, with a child below 16 years raped every 155th minute, a child below 10 every 13th hour and one in every 10 children sexually abused at any point of time" (as cited in Ministry of Women and Child Development [MWCD], 2007, p. 7). The largest Indian 'Study on Child Abuse' released by MWCD (2007), covering 13 Indian states and comprising 12447 children (51.9% males, 48.1 % females) in the age group of 5-18 years, found that 69% of the children suffered physical abuse, 53.22% children reported having faced sexual abuse and every second child reported facing emotional abuse.

In a cross-sectional survey through focused group discussions by Patel and Andrew (2001), on 811 adolescents from 11th standard from various higher secondary schools of Goa, it was found that one-third of adolescents had histories of sexual abuse. Another Indian NGO Tulir-Centre for Prevention and Healing of Child Sexual Abuse, along with an international organization, 'Save the Children', in 2006, found that in India child domestic workers tend to face all types of abuse in the houses they provide their services. The findings of this study, which was conducted in West Bengal, showed that: of all the research participants 68.3% have faced physical abuse, 86% of the total children working as domestic aids have faced some form of emotional abuse, and about 94.4% have faced sexual abuse of one form or the other (Tulir-CPHCSA, 2006).

An online newspaper Jagran Josh ("Child abuse in India Increased According to the Report of NCPCR", 2011, January 6) published that according to the National Commission for Protection of Child Rights (NCPCR) report, child abuse in India has increased from 35 in 2007-08 to 763 in 2009-10. The maximum number of child abuse complaints i.e. 179 was received from Uttar Pradesh, which was followed by Delhi (127), Orissa (58), Bihar (46), Madhya Pradesh (42) and West Bengal (39). Even more, according to the report of Human Rights Watch (2013), the studies from India suggest that more than 7,200 children (including infants) are raped every year and the experts believe that many more cases go unreported. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.