Academic journal article Journal of the Indian Academy of Applied Psychology

The Role of Life Style in Development of Coronary Heart Disease

Academic journal article Journal of the Indian Academy of Applied Psychology

The Role of Life Style in Development of Coronary Heart Disease

Article excerpt

Cardiovascular disease is reported to be the leading cause of death in world. In 1998, 12.4 million people died of heart attack and stroke. Of these 78% were in low and middle income countries. The high income countries had lower death rates because of better preventive and treatment program (Barker, Cox, Kumaran, & Osmond, 1996). Though, several clinical and biochemical risk factors have been identified, the role of psychological factors are also gaining importance during the past few decades. Several risk factors have been identified to be associated with CHD which include causative risk factors (hypertension, hyperlipidemia and diabetes), conditional risk factors (triglycerides and lipoprotein), and predisposing risk factors (obesity, physical activity, sex, family history, socioeconomic factors, insulin resistance and psychological factors) (Deepa, Pradeep & Mohan, 2001). Evidence of various studies has shown a strong association in psychological stress and CHD. Cardiovascular disorders pose a major health problem for industrialized societies in terms of excess of morbidity and mortality. It is evident from the review of literature that there is a strong relationship between coronary heart disease and some psychological factors. Psychological variables like stress, personality, anxiety and life style are contributing along with high blood pressure, obesity; lack of exercise, cigarette smoking and high blood cholesterol to the development of CHD (Stephan, David, & Christopher, 2002).In present study, a comparative study is carried out between coronary heart disease patients and non coronary individuals in relation to life style.

Large number of clinical and biochemical factors have been identified in development of CHD, the role of psychosocial factors are also gaining importance during the past few decades. The World Health Organization has stated that since 1990, 80 to 90 % of people dying from CHD had one or more risk factors associated with life style (WHO Reports, 2002). Life style is a way person lives. This includes patterns of individual's health behaviour, social interactions, attitudes, values, belief and essentially the way the person perceived by himself/herself and at times also how he /she perceived by others. Life style is one of the major factors which have shown a strong association with CHD (Cohen, 2000). Life style is based on subjective perception, is purposeful and goal directed. It is motivated by a desire to overcome feeling of inadequacy coupled with an urge to succeed. The general goals of life style are to understand, predict, and control life and self. Life style has been found, as pointed out earlier, to have influence on individual's health, adjustment to environment, psychosomatic and psychiatric illness (Rice, 1999). Health psychologists found that healthy life style and dietary intake are associated with positive effects on blood cholesterol (Williams, 2001). Diet, sleeping pattern, smoking, and alcohol taking habits have a negative effect on health (Williams, 2001).

Russek and Zohman (1958) observed in young coronary patients that prolonged emotional strain was associated with job responsibility. The Framingham study had demonstrated the significance of life style, employment and interpersonal stress. By showing that in males under 65, aging worries and daily stress and tension were associated with a greater risk of developing CHD, while for males and females over 65; marital dissatisfaction or disagreements were risk factors for CHD (Taylor, 1999). A diet high in fat, Obesity and lack of exercise increases the risk of heart disease. Tobacco use , whether it is smoking or chewing tobacco, increases risk of Cardiovascular disease (The Vestfold Heart Care Study Group, 2003).

There is a positive relationship between heart disease and fat intake, obesity, smoking and lack of exercise. The relationship between smoking and risk for CHD is simple and direct. Smoking has several negative effects on cardiovascular system (MacDougall, 1983, cited in Rice, 1999). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.