Academic journal article Modern Journal of Language Teaching Methods

The Comparison of Computer Assisted Teaching and Traditional Explicit Method in Learning/teaching English Vocabulary

Academic journal article Modern Journal of Language Teaching Methods

The Comparison of Computer Assisted Teaching and Traditional Explicit Method in Learning/teaching English Vocabulary

Article excerpt

1. Introduction

More than three decades ago, Meara (1980) called for more research on the nature of vocabulary acquisition; since then, there has been a considerable amount of literature devoted to the role of vocabulary in second and foreign language learning and how vocabulary itself can and should be taught. (Bell, 2009; Churchill, 2008; Laufer, 1998; Laufer and Paribakht, 1998; Schmitt, 1998; Webb, 2008; Zheng, 2009). On the other hand, the so-called computer era has revolutionized most of the fields of human endeavor including ELT. This revolution in ELT has another noticeable aspect; the computer facilities and what they can offer to ELT is constantly changing. These changes have their repercussions in ELT and there is a need for revising previous findings and moving toward new theories. This study tried to compare two ways of doing vocabulary instruction; the traditional explicit one which has so far been with us (and most probably will continue to be) and an innovative one which tries to open new windows to contextualization of our vocabulary teaching practices and effective teaching of it through computer. Since technology is improving in almost daily bases, it is indispensable to interpret any claim in the context of the technology of that very particular day in which the claim is made. The purpose of this study is to determine and compare learning vocabulary through Computer Assisted Teaching (CAT) and learning it via traditional method. We will specifically try:

1. To determine the impact of computer assisted teaching on vocabulary learning.

2. To determine the impact of traditional explicit teaching on vocabulary learning.

3. To determine students? attitude toward two different vocabulary teaching strategy.

The secondary purpose of this study is to discuss the pedagogical implication of the findings of the study in the light of new developments in the views toward SLA and TEFL. That is, the implications for curriculum design; teacher and student roles as well as testing vocabulary are discussed. So the research hypotheses were as follows:

H01: There is no effect of explicit traditional teaching of vocabulary on first grade high school students' vocabulary achievement.

H02: There is no effect of technologically contextualized teaching of vocabulary on first grade high school students' vocabulary achievement.

H03: There is no difference between the performances of the group taught by technologically contextualized vocabulary and the group taught by using traditional explicit method.

H04: There is no difference of attitude among first grade high school students toward explicit traditional teaching of vocabulary and technologically contextualized teaching of vocabulary.

2. Vocabulary knowledge and its importance

What does the knowledge of the vocabulary of a language involve? What is the role of this knowledge? Paribakht and Wesche (1993) created a five stage Vocabulary Knowledge Scale. Their scale starts from no knowledge of vocabulary to a native like mastery of them:

Stage 1: The word is not familiar at all.

Stage 2: The word is familiar but the meaning is not known.

Stage 3: A correct synonym or translation is given.

Stage 4: The word is used with semantic appropriateness in a sentence.

Stage 5: The word is used with semantic appropriateness and grammatical accuracy in a sentence. They mention that while talking about vocabulary gain the first question arising for the researchers is to know what it means to know a word. Nagy and Scott (2000) pointed out five characteristics of vocabulary knowledge. First, knowing a word is a matter of degree, not all or nothing. This is known as the incremental view of word knowledge. The first comprehensive scale for vocabulary knowledge is maybe for Dale (1965) who proposed four stages of degree of word knowledge; (1) never heard it before, (2) heard it but doesn't know what it means, (3) recognizes it in context as having something to do with, and (4) knows it well. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.