Academic journal article Journal of Singing

Russian Romantic Art Song

Academic journal article Journal of Singing

Russian Romantic Art Song

Article excerpt

Russian Romantic Art Song. Compiled and Edited by Anton Belov.

Classical Vocal Reprints 2015. Available in high and low voice. Difficulty level: moderate to advanced.

Composers Include: Anton Arensky (1861-1906), Cesar Cui (1835-1918), Alexander Balakirev (1837-1910), Alexander Borodin (1833-1887), Alexander Dargomyzhsky (1813-1869), Alexander Glazunov (1865-1936), Mikhail Glinka (1804-1857), Alexander Grechaninov (1864-1956), Alexander Gurilev (1803-1858), Mikhail Ippollto-Ivanov (1859-1935), Nikolai Medtner (1880-1951), Modest Mussorgsky (1839-1881), Sergey Rachmaninoff (1873-1943), Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844-1908), Anton Rubinstein (1829-1894), Sergey Taneyev (1856-1915), Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893), Alexander Varlamov (1801-1848).

As singers and educators, we live in an age when we have ready access to song genres hitherto considered exotic or difficult to acquire. Many excellent anthologies, containing phonetic and English translations as well as language guidance, are readily available. In the field of Russian opera and song, a number of very helpful resources now exist, including Jean Piatek's Russian Songs and Arias: Phonetic Readings, Word by Word Translations, Richard Sylvester's anthologies of songs by Rachmaninoff and Tchaikovsky, and the Edition Peters of Russian Operatic Arias for various voice types. With the publication of Russian Romantic Art Song, a new anthology introduced this year by the plucky small publisher Classical Vocal Reprints, we now have a collection of the songs of better known Russian composers, such as Modest Mussorgsky and Sergei Rachmaninoff, and their less well known colleagues, such as Alexander Varlamov and Alexander Dargomyshsky. Editor Dr. Anton Belov, baritone on the faculty of Linfeld College in Oregon, has compiled this excellent collection, for both high and low voice, and has sorted the composers and their songs as represented in the various schools. These include the Russian bel canto school, heavily influenced by their Italian and German contemporaries; the Mighty Five, those composers, highly nationalistic in style, also known as the Mighty Handful; the Conservatory School, which includes composers educated in and teaching at the St. Petersburg and Moscow conservatories; and the composers of the late romantic period. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.