Academic journal article Arab Studies Journal

Modernity, Identity, and Technology in Palestine before the Nakba: Arab Christians in British Mandate Palestine: Communalism and Nationalism, 1917-1948/the Storyteller of Jerusalem: The Life and Times of Wasif Jawhariyyeh, 1904-1948/memoirs of an Early Arab Feminist: The Life and Activism of Anbara Salam Khalidi/"this Is Jerusalem Calling": State Radio in Mandate Palestine

Academic journal article Arab Studies Journal

Modernity, Identity, and Technology in Palestine before the Nakba: Arab Christians in British Mandate Palestine: Communalism and Nationalism, 1917-1948/the Storyteller of Jerusalem: The Life and Times of Wasif Jawhariyyeh, 1904-1948/memoirs of an Early Arab Feminist: The Life and Activism of Anbara Salam Khalidi/"this Is Jerusalem Calling": State Radio in Mandate Palestine

Article excerpt

MODERNITY, IDENTITY, AND TECHNOLOGY IN PALESTINE BEFORE THE NAKBA ARAB CHRISTIANS IN BRITISH MANDATE PALESTINE: COMMUNALISM AND NATIONALISM, 1917 1948 Noah Ha iduc-Dale Edinburgh: Edinburgh Universit y Press, 2013 (v ii + 221 pages, bibliography, index) $110.00 (cloth)

THE STORYTELLER OF JERUSALEM: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF WASIF JAWHARIYYEH, 1904 1948 Wasif Jawhariy yeh, edited and introduced by Salim Tamari and Issam Nassar, translated by Nada Elzeer, foreword by Rachel Beck les Willson Northampton, MA, and Beirut, Lebanon: Olive Bra nch Press and Institute for Palestine Studies, 2014 (xli + 304 pages, appendi x, notes, glossary, index) $25.00 (paper)

MEMOIRS OF AN EARLY ARAB FEMINIST: THE LIFE AND ACTIVISM OF ANBARA SALAM KHALIDI Anbara Salam Khalidi, translated by Tarif Khalidi, foreword by Marina Warner London: Pluto Press, 2013 (xiv + 169 pages, index) $26.00 (paper), $85.00 (clot h)

"THIS IS JERUSALEM CALLING": STATE RADIO IN MANDATE PALESTINE Andrea L . Stanton Austin: Universit y of Texas Press, 2013 (i x + 258 pages, timeline, notes, bibliography, index) $55.00 (cloth) $25.0 0 (paper)

'Anbara Salam and Wasif Jawhariyya (Jawhariyyeh) were both born in 1897, the former in Beirut and the latter in Jerusalem. Salam was born into a notable Beiruti family-her father, Salim 'Ali Salam, was an Ottoman parliamentarian, president of the municipality of Beirut, and a prominent Arab nationalist, and her brother Sa'ib served as Lebanon's prime minister six times between 1952 and 1973. She married into a notable Jerusalemite family, wedding Ahmad Samih Khalidi and moving to Palestine in 1929. Active in women's organizations throughout her youth, 'Anbara Salam Khalidi was also a literary figure, translating Homer and Virgil into Arabic. Jawhariyya, a musician and civil servant, came from somewhat less elite origins: his father was mukhtar of Jerusalem's Eastern Orthodox community, but his connection to the city's notables was largely through patronage networks. Both Khalidi and Jawhariyya fled Jerusalem in 1948 and resettled in Beirut, and both wrote memoirs that have recently been translated into English. The parallels between the lives of these two individuals, as well their differences-serious and scholarly 'Anbara is quite a contrast to Wasif the flâneur-make reading their memoirs in concert a rewarding experience, yielding a rich composite of Levantine life in the late Ottoman and Mandate periods.

Published in Arabic in 1978, 'Anbara Salam Khalidi's memoirs are translated by Tarif Khalidi, who is the author's son, a scholar of Arab and Islamic history, and translator of an English-language publication of the Qur'an (Penguin Classics, 2008). In a style that reflects certain norms of Arabic memoir and autobiography, the text combines and intertwines personal reflection, historical narrative, and short biographical sketches of family members, associates, and acquaintances. These biographical sketches may interest historians seeking to reconstruct networks of Arab women activists and literary figures in the Mandate era, as well as scholars of Arabic and Islamic traditions of biography and autobiography. Generally, though, the most revealing and lively material comes when Khalidi recalls her own experiences.

One is immediately struck by the importance of family in the course of Khalidi's life, and she prefaces her memoirs by stating, "I cannot separate the days I spent in my particular environment throughout the various stages of my life from the family milieu in which I grew up" (2). Her dedication to education and literature finds a precedent in her mother, who "read religious and historical works as well as the Arabic novels published in her days, and knew much about Arab and Islamic history" (15). Khalidi's father, too, supported her education and her active engagement in philanthropy and other forms of public engagement.

Family was not only an institution of support, however, but also a structure through which social restrictions on women played out. …

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