Academic journal article Marvels & Tales

From the Editors

Academic journal article Marvels & Tales

From the Editors

Article excerpt

Fairy tales are wonder tales, but not all tales of wonder are fairy tales. In colonial contexts, all too commonly, the label of fairy tale has been imposed on the wondrous stories-histories, belief narratives, and fictions-of colonized peoples with damaging and lasting results. For instance, referring to Hawaiian mo'olelo (story, legend, tradition, or history) as fairy tale overlooks the intimate relationship that mo'olelo weave, linking humans to specific places, natural phenomena, and events; disconnects the stories from their native generic identification; and mistakes their ways of knowing for signs of primitivism and ignorance. With guest editors Bryan Kamaoli Kuwada and Aiko Yamashiro, we are pleased to publish this special issue, "Rooted in Wonder," in the hope that it marks a step toward resituating and invigorating a decolonial conversation between Indigenous and folklore and fairy-tale studies.

Bryan Kamaoli Kuwada is the co-translator of The Epic Tale of Hi'iakaikapoliopele: Woman of the Sunrise, Lightning-Skirted Beauty of Halema'uma'u, As Told by Ho'oulumahiehie (2006); and Aiko Yamashiro is co-editor of The Value of Hawai'i 2: Ancestral Roots, Oceanic Visions (2014). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.