Academic journal article Child Welfare

From the Editor: Forty Years and Counting: A Journey through Learning Organizations, Educational Attainment for Foster Youth, Smoking Bans in Foster Homes, Relational Interventions for Adopted Children, and Cyberbulling

Academic journal article Child Welfare

From the Editor: Forty Years and Counting: A Journey through Learning Organizations, Educational Attainment for Foster Youth, Smoking Bans in Foster Homes, Relational Interventions for Adopted Children, and Cyberbulling

Article excerpt

In 2016, I celebrate my 40th year as a professional in child welfare. I never intended to stay in this work that long, but once I started I realized how important it was. I began as a child welfare worker in a cottage with 15 "baby" boys-sleeping in three nights a week, with no training. It was a different world in 1976. Many things have changed in those 40 years: new evidence-based treatment approaches, tested innovations, the development of learning organizations, smoke-free foster homes. Keeping current and finding new ways to continuously improve the quality of our work with children, youth, and families are all approaches that are supported by the peer-reviewed articles we publish in Child Welfare.

As in past issues, this issue of Child Welfare focuses on a wide range of critical issues in the field of child welfare. We hope that you enjoy reading these articles and are challenged to continuously improve the quality of your work with children, youth, and family services.

Understanding correlates of higher educational attainment among foster care youths is the focus of our first article, authored by Hunter, Monroe, and Garand. Using National Youth in Transition Data (NYTD) and child welfare administrative data, multiple regression analysis was conducted to determine significant correlates of higher educational attainment for a sample of 1,266 foster care youth. These findings revealed ten significant correlates, including receipt of postsecondary support, which showed the strongest association.

Olenik-Shemesh and Heiman, in our second article, explore the phenomenon of cyberbullying among primary children in relation to social support, loneliness, self-efficacy, and well-being. The study consisted of 398 Israeli students aged 10-12. Findings indicate a significant prevalence of cyber-victimization (20.4%) among primary school children. Cyber-victimization was correlated with low social support, low selfefficacy, low subjective well-being, and high sense of loneliness.

A trust-based relational intervention® (TBRI®) for adopted children receiving therapy in an outpatient setting is the focus in our third article, by colleagues Howard, Parris, Nielsen, Lusk, Bus, Purvis, and Cross. This preliminary study investigated the effects of implementing traumainformed intervention training with traditional post-adoption services. Results from the study showed a reduction in children's psychiatric problems, as well as parents' own stress levels, when parents demonstrated an investment in the intervention model. …

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