Academic journal article et Cetera

Realities: Words, "Minds," Institutions, Psychoanalysis and Cosmoanalysis: A Calculus-Structural-Heuristic Approach (Part 2)

Academic journal article et Cetera

Realities: Words, "Minds," Institutions, Psychoanalysis and Cosmoanalysis: A Calculus-Structural-Heuristic Approach (Part 2)

Article excerpt

General Semantics (GS) "is" (exists as) a way of thinking: a way of thinking about the way we think about things based on explicitly stated principles we could apply to help us better manage our inner and outer realities. Recognizing potentially harmful identifications poses a major challenge for each one of us: Tools that we can use to help us address this challenge include conscious abstracting, a calculus-structural approach, consciousness of abstracting, and the principle of non-identity. Using these tools we can develop an approach that suggests that if no two of us, groups, institutions, etc., are the same in all respects, if we are beings at different degrees of conscious times-binding development, then we will "see" things differently and see different things. Our differences will involve different needs, fears, concerns, beliefs, prejudices, opinions, goals, and concerns for stature, importance, leadership, and different responses to our differences. We can expect different proposed solutions, different approaches to dealing with problems, and different intensities of personal and institutional resistance-a consequence of different interests, interpretations, and understandings of situations. At international levels, a major obstacle for the race in recognizing and diminishing identifications toward achieving racial harmony includes "scapegoating": Instead of recognizing our collective racial contributions to our international problems, we elementalistically repress and suppress our individual and national contributions-holding-identifying this or that group, tribe, "-cans," "-ians," -ites, etc., as the responsible agents. Overall, any proposed solution (including GS) for improving our human condition toward higher levels of sanity and intelligent behaviors, or even a suggestion that we have a problem deserving attention, will be met with a diversity of disagreements-resulting in even more disharmony. There will be many ready to oppose proposals or suggestions for improvements simply to emphasize that they are different, and to be noticed: "I think differently ... therefore I am" (to paraphrase Descartes. And then there are some who will oppose "just for the fun of it." Considering the above, I presently imagine a goal to improve the sanity of the race a highly probable futile endeavor. But through conscious times-binding and conscious times-binding ethics, concerned individuals can expand their times-binding intelligences to better cope with what presently appears to be a period of intensifying racial disharmonies.

As brooms are not usually designed to clean themselves (but can clean other brooms), we are challenged in cleaning up our inner semantic realities. Our "minds," in not recognizing their different levels of representationabstractions, contribute to our personal and institutional difficulties in not recognizing and accepting responsibility for how we create a great deal of our human problems. Attributing the source of our problems solely to agencies other than our "mind-processes" could be an origin of "scapegoating." Some words about "mind-processes": "Mind" minds "mind." "Mind" mines "mind." "Mind" undermines "minds": Our "minds" (as multidimensional processes active at conscious and nonconscious levels) take care of themselves to a certain degree. Our "minds" store memories, information, associations, patterns, etc.-treasures they can mine. We, at self-conscious levels (derivatives, functions of nonconscious "mind"-processes) can mine valuable information about ourselves by being aware that "What we think, believe, imagine, say, about anyone or anything also say 'some things' about ourselves ... the range of our knowledge and understanding, values, concerns, interests, likes, dislikes, prejudices, etc." And we can mine important to know information about our "mind"-processes by being aware that "whenever we agree or disagree with anyone about anything, we are in effect agreeing/disagreeing with ourselves. …

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