Academic journal article Perspectives in Public Health

Editorial - September 2016

Academic journal article Perspectives in Public Health

Editorial - September 2016

Article excerpt

There is an increasing shiftin direction from all aspects of public health and that is towards sustainability. In parallel, a 'new' word - 'ecosystem' - is entering our consciousness and parlance. The UN's Millennium Ecosystem Assessment1 brought the principles and framework of ecosystem services to a higher policy profile, by highlighting a way of assessing how ecosystems influence human wellbeing. To date, the debate has mainly concentrated on the importance of bio-physical assets; however, the scope is broadening and increasingly, the focus is on life support systems, with more non-material services such as culture, health and wellbeing. If we consider food as an example, whereas 'healthy diets' emphasise nutrition, sustainability goes beyond this remit and considers multiple impacts at once, from farm to fork. Sustainable diets must protect biodiversity and ecosystems; be culturally acceptable and accessible; deliver nutritious, healthy, safe and adequate food and finally, optimise natural and human resources.2 It is therefore fitting in this issue of Perspectives that we have a submission from Lawrence et al.3 which puts ecosystems firmly in the spotlight of public health and asks the question whether an ecosystem's approach to health promotion can succeed where reductionism has failed?

Within the peer review section, we have two papers that address the topic of tobacco, one is in relation to consumption4 and the other is in relation to the use of e-cigarettes as a substitute, which came out of smoking cessation data collected from research exploring Scottish secondary school students' recall of key messages from tobacco-education interventions.5 Both conclude consistent tobacco-education initiatives and raising the level of awareness through a population approach could be an effective intervention. Interestingly, using a combination of motivational interviewing and health screening to elicit behaviour change (and subsequent improvements in health-related outcomes) was successful in improving the health of employees with an 'at-risk' profile in a Sheffield Wellness service.6 Certainly, the opportunities for health-based conversations and interventions are increasingly due to the breadth and presence of multi-disciplinary services being delivered to a population within a community.7 It is by developing cross-disciplinary methodological approaches and promoting knowledge transfer between different empirical research traditions and by bringing together different practice communities that we can make a difference. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.