Academic journal article International Journal of Education and Development using Information and Communication Technology

2015 Global Information Technology Report: Consequences on Knowledge Management in Higher Education Institutions in Nigeria

Academic journal article International Journal of Education and Development using Information and Communication Technology

2015 Global Information Technology Report: Consequences on Knowledge Management in Higher Education Institutions in Nigeria

Article excerpt

1. INTRODUCTION

As information technology (IT) advances strongly in the 21st century, higher education institutions (HEIs) have witnessed great changes in their traditional role of knowledge dissemination. The combination of IT resources such as the Internet, projected equipments, web-based resources, and PowerPoint software into the instructional methods (Lu & Cheng, 2012), and the number one factor with its complex set of connections presents increasingly innovative services that have major consequences in the processes of knowledge management (KM) in higher education (Ololube, Kpolovie, Amaele, Amanchukwu & Briggs, 2013). The methods that guide knowledge integration according to Gupta and Bostrom (2009) and Lu and Cheng (2012) are the use of computer-based and web-based learning technological instructions adopted by HEIs in processing and organizing their information and communication needs.

The promotion and development of knowledge society through IT tools is one of the deliberate plans that is gradually approved in recent times by HEIs globally to progress and support economic growth and development (Agabi, Agbor & Ololube, 2015; Ololube, Ubogu & Egbezor, 2007). Significantly, HEIs worldwide are burdened with the task of developing knowledge societies (Goddard, 2005; Akuegwu et al., 2011). Consequently, countries in the west have been upbeat towards increasing tactics to impel efforts aimed at providing HEIs the opportunity to bring uniformity and achieve knowledge parity for students (Altbach et al., 2009). However, notwithstanding the advances in IT, HEIs in developing economies are still faced with multifaceted challenges in their academic programming and reaching the goals of supporting the development of knowledge societies (Tremblay et al., 2012).

The low IT literacy rate in many HEIs in the sub-Sahara is a major concern and has impacted on the way other counties of the world are viewed (Phelps, 2002; Ololube et al., 2013). IT literacy rate in the context of this paper is the capability (knowledge, proficiency and ability) of stakeholders in HEIs to identify, explore, presents and diffuse information in order to collect knowledge and develop the culture of learning to be critical and self-critical, and learning to create knowledge (Agabi et al., 2015). The ability to generate new knowledge is the ability to be able to create knowledge based on one's own experiences and creating knowledge where none exist (Ololube, 2012; Zeng & Yunkuo, 2014). These efforts have set the ball to roll in our conducts in life because IT has transformed and impacted on educational methodologies in HEIs globally (The Economist Intelligence Unit, 2008).

Advancement in technological innovation is steadily becoming a hallmark of academic research, teaching and learning in HEIs. However, it is significant to inform that the changes taking place in HEIs is not extensive and there is the need to reinforce IT penetrations to reach greater percentage of students and faculty members (Ifinedo, 2005, 2006).

The globalization of higher education and the efforts at creating knowledge societies through IT include components of network connectivity, computer hardware and software, and several other strategies critical to achieving valuable KM (Agabi et al., 2015). IT components have provided modern opportunities for teaching, learning, research and direction in HEIs (Lopez, 2003).

KM models are enormously vital to guarantee successful national development of Nigeria's economy and society (Agabi et al., 2015). The approaches involve the process of including novel information into an existing body of knowledge by applying several approaches (Bellinger et al., 2004). The said processes and approaches entail the determination of how new information and the existing knowledge interrelate with each other, how an existing body of knowledge should be made to other to accommodate new information, and how new information should be structured to reflect existing knowledge (Cárdenas, Al-Jibouri, Halman & van Tol, 2013). …

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