Academic journal article College Composition and Communication

From the Editor: Growing the Argument

Academic journal article College Composition and Communication

From the Editor: Growing the Argument

Article excerpt

Amy Lynch-Biniek

I have in this space encouraged scholars at the intersections of English studies and labor studies to consider local contexts, as our geography, institutional settings, and personal circumstances can both enrich analysis and constrain appropriate action. In contrast, the authors in this issue of Forum remind me of the importance of keeping an eye on the larger picture, as well. The study of academic labor might benefit from appropriating the environmental activists' motto, "Think globally; act locally."

While we very much need continued study of English and writing departments, we should not lose sight of the parallel structures in other programs, departments, and universities; the more we can make connections among our contexts, the more information, allies, and possibilities are made available to us. In this issue, Robert Samuels reminds us, "The central problem is not primarily an issue of how people see the teaching of writing; rather, the problem stems from the social hierarchies placing research over teaching, faculty over students, theory over practice, and disciplines over general education" (7). How might reframing our research to consider the ways in which introductory math courses are staffed or resources given to contingent history professors enrich our understanding of the system?

We need to understand labor policies' connections to larger administrative, institutional and cultural contexts. …

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