Academic journal article Journal of Electronic Commerce Research

Exploring the Effects of Unexpected Outcome on Satisfaction and Continuance Intention

Academic journal article Journal of Electronic Commerce Research

Exploring the Effects of Unexpected Outcome on Satisfaction and Continuance Intention

Article excerpt

1.Introduction

Expectation disconfirmation theory has been widely adopted in the marketing area in order to understand repurchase intentions. Based on expectancy theory, theorists argue that each consumer possesses certain expectations before purchasing a product or service. Satisfaction is determined by confirmation, the extent to which the experience of consumption meets one's initial expectations [Oliver 1980]. Furthermore, while realized performance has a positive impact, the expectation, in general, reduces the possibility of confirmation. As an outcome, customers tend to make repurchase decisions if they are satisfied with the product or service. Recently, IS researchers also adopted this concept to understand the intention to continue using various information systems or electronic services (e.g., online banking [Bhattacherjee 2001b], online shopping [Bhattacherjee 2001a; Ha 2006; Hsu et al. 2006; Liao et al. 2009; Lu et al. 2012], online game [Liao et al. 2016], e-learning [Lee 2010], knowledge sharing [Chiu et al. 2011], Internet protocol television (IPTV) [Lin et al. 2012], strategic information systems [Lankton et al. 2014], IT outsourcing [Gorla and Somers 2014], and social networking [Hu et al. 2014]).

However, many studies have treated expectation as a unidimensional construct and examined its impact on satisfaction [Fan and Suh 2014; Lankton et al. 2014; Lee and Kwon 2011]. Although some recent studies have started to take the multi-dimensional nature of expectation into consideration [e.g. Chiu et al. 2005; Jin et al. 2010; Lankton and McKnight 2012], they have taken only the positive part of expectation into consideration. However, prior to consumption, users may expect certain negative outcomes in addition to their positive expectations. In addition, given that many users have limited experience of the product or service prior to their actual use or consumption of it, some experiences may be outside of their initial expectations. Customers may receive unexpected benefits from the consumption, or encounter some problems that were not expected initially. While unexpected positive experiences may enhance satisfaction and continuance intention, unexpected negative experiences may reduce satisfaction and the possibility of continuance. Failure to take these negative expectations and unexpected effects into consideration limits our understanding of the determinants of satisfaction and weakens the predicting power of expectancy theory.

For example, blogs are a popular channel for individuals to express their own opinions online [Rosenbloom 2004]. A blog is defined as "frequently modified web pages in which dated entries are listed in reverse chronological sequence" [Herring et al. 2004]. Some researchers believe blogs are interactive websites, a new form of communication that allows bloggers to publish and exchange knowledge/information [Chung et al. 2007; Rosenbloom 2004; Zhang et al. 2012]. Based on the above definitions, blogs are websites in which an individual or group logs information to be shared and interacts with others who are interested in the website. Concurrent with the growth of Web 2.0, physicians have begun adopting this channel to express their thoughts or even to communicate with their patients [Chesanow 2004; Lagu et al. 2008]. The term "physician blogs" refers to blogs owned and maintained by physicians. Physicians, in general, possess certain expectations regarding this new communication channel. While positive expectations drive them to use a blog, they may expect some potential negative outcomes as well. For example, writing articles and interacting with readers is a time consuming task. In addition, negative feedback or even criticism is not avoidable since not all readers agree with each point expressed by one blogger.

However, the actual use of a blog may also bring some unexpected outcomes. While some unexpected outcomes are positive, some may be negative. For example, bloggers may not expect some actual income generated from advertisements (which can be viewed as positive); however, bloggers may be sued for illegally revealing certain information. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.