Academic journal article Journal of Juvenile Justice

Editor's Note

Academic journal article Journal of Juvenile Justice

Editor's Note

Article excerpt

We are pleased to present the 10th issue of The Journal of Juvenile Justice (JOJJ). The first part of this issue explores the variables that are associated with contact with the juvenile justice system and recidivism for youth. Calleja and colleagues evaluate reentry services provided through Second Chance Act Juvenile Reentry funding. The authors find that specialized reentry services that incorporate case management, and substance use and functional ability assessments, were more effective than basic reentry services. Comparing 117 male juvenile offenders who received specialized services with a control group of 156 male juvenile offenders receiving basic reentry services, Calleja and colleagues found that at a 2-year follow-up, control group participants recidivated at more than two times the rate of the experimental group. Nonsexual offenders were six times more likely to recidivate than sexual offenders. Van Wormer and Campbell evaluate the Fast Accountability Skills Training (FAST) program in which youth who violate probation receive two sessions of accountability skill development instead of a formal hearing and a stay in detention. The authors found that FAST does not reduce recidivism or future probation violations, but suggest that an increase in the number of sessions offered in the program may be more effective. Robison and colleagues used state administrative databases from 1996-2012 in Louisiana to examine a sample of 615,515 public school students for variables that were major predictors of juvenile justice contact. …

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