Academic journal article McGill Journal of Education (Online)

Similarities and Differences in Risk and Protective Factors in Teacher Induction for Prospective Elementary and Physical and Health Education Teachers/similarités et Différences Concernant Les Facteurs De Risque et De Protection Reliés À L'insertion Professionnelle De Futurs Enseignants Du Primaire et De Futurs Enseignants D'éducation Physique et À la Santé

Academic journal article McGill Journal of Education (Online)

Similarities and Differences in Risk and Protective Factors in Teacher Induction for Prospective Elementary and Physical and Health Education Teachers/similarités et Différences Concernant Les Facteurs De Risque et De Protection Reliés À L'insertion Professionnelle De Futurs Enseignants Du Primaire et De Futurs Enseignants D'éducation Physique et À la Santé

Article excerpt

A wealth of research on teachers' professional induction early in their career illustrates the precarious conditions they experience (Blankenship & Coleman, 2009).1 The induction period is often considered a crucial and adverse moment in a teacher's career (Tait, 2008). Portelance, Mukamurera, Martineau and Gervais (2008) argued that induction is now more complex than before because precarious conditions amplify the inherent challenges. Houlfort and Sauvé (2010) added that this precariousness seems to be the primary factor affecting early career teachers' psychological health. Moreover, even though beginning teachers experience an intensive period of learning and adaptation (Feiman-Nemser, Schwille, Carver, & Yusko, 1999), they are expected to almost immediately assume the same responsibility as experienced teachers (Fantilli & McDougall, 2009; Le Maistre & Paré, 2010). As if this were not daunting enough, novice teachers are often burdened with the heaviest and most complex tasks (Conseil supérieur de l'éducation [CSE], 2004). These demanding tasks, shunned by everyone else (Gingras & Mukamurera, 2008), often consist of residual duties (Portelance et al., 2008) with less attractive schedules (Martineau & Vallerand, 2007) and fragmented, difficult-to-manage chores (Mukamurera, 2005) with challenging students (Fantilli & McDougall, 2009; Fletcher, Chang, & Kong, 2008; Martineau, Gervais, Portelance, & Mukamurera, 2008; Moir, 2009) in schools with the greatest needs (Moir, 2009). These conditions probably help to explain the "reality shock" beginning teachers experience, as many of them are confronted with a gap between expectations and reality (Le Maistre & Paré, 2010; Mukamurera, Bourque, & Gingras, 2008).

All these challenges have significant impacts on early career teachers' experience including high stress levels (Cossette, 1999), psychological distress (Mukamurera, Bourque, & Ntebuste, 2010), burnout (Fives, Hammam, & Olivarez, 2007), and even attrition. A number of international studies during the last decade indicated that the teacher attrition rate during the first years of induction fluctuates between 20% and 50% depending on the study or country (Martel, 2009; Parker & Martin, 2009; Rushton, Morgan, & Richard, 2007; Sharplin, O'Neill, & Chapman, 2011; Tamir, 2010). Other researchers also suggested that many teachers consider leaving the profession during their first five years of teaching - even if they do not end up doing so (Fantilli & McDougall, 2009; Mukamurera et al., 2008). The main causes of teacher attrition include heavy workload, lack of support and resources, a sense of inadequacy, and challenging behaviours and special needs on the part of students (Jeffrey & Sun, 2008; Mansfield, Beltman, Price, & McConney, 2012; Tait, 2008).

Given that retention in the early stages of the profession appears to be a major concern in many countries (Beltman, Mansfield, & Price, 2011; Le Cornu, 2009; Mansfield et al., 2012), some researchers argued that studying teacher resilience may be a way to promote "quality retention" (Gu & Day, 2007, p. 1314). According to Mukamurera et al. (2010), it also offers the opportunity to address positive adaptation for early career teachers, a promising avenue to counteract the adverse consequences of a challenging induction.

Though many studies have attempted to identify the barriers to teacher induction and their consequences, few have examined the transition from teacher education to induction. However, following Woolfolk Hoy and Burke Spero's (2005) results, it would be interesting to better understand why the increase in efficacy by the end of student teaching decreases during the first year of teaching. Moreover, very few researches have studied the situation of physical and health education teachers (PHETs) in particular (Blankenship & Coleman, 2009). Spallanzani, Desbiens and Beaudoin (2012) found significant differences in their teacher induction experience. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.