Academic journal article European Journal of Sustainable Development

Sustainable Development of Seaport Cities through Circular Economy: A Comparative Study with Implications to Suez Canal Corridor Project

Academic journal article European Journal of Sustainable Development

Sustainable Development of Seaport Cities through Circular Economy: A Comparative Study with Implications to Suez Canal Corridor Project

Article excerpt

1. Introduction

As seaport areas and coastal cities have significant potential for industrial projects, they have a particular development potential. At the same time, they should pay attention to pollution prevention, resources and waste management, and minimizing environmental costs in order to enhance seaport sustainable development and competitiveness. Port sustainable development can be defined as the ability of meeting its needs without endangering its own future. If coastal cities are serious in their attempt to launch a sustainable development model, circular thinking can be adopted.

Egypt started the development of the Suez Canal corridor as a mega national project aimed at encouraging sustainable development through developing three major regions along the banks of Suez Canal (figure 1 illustrates the location of the project). This paper targets studying the project proposal compared to the best practices in ports cities that succeeded to support sustainable development depending on the use of the circular economy model.

In order to achieve its goals, the paper studies an overview on the circular economy model in section two. In section three, the theoretical preview of circular economy is analyzed. The potential opportunities of adopting circular economy are studied in section four. Then in section five, the best practices of circular economy in seaport cities are analyzed. Finally in section six, the Suez Canal Corridor Development Project is evaluated from the circular economy perspective. The paper is ended up by conclusions and recommendations.

2. An overview on circular economy model

The concept of "circular economy" has its roots in the industrial environment (Rizos, Behrens, Kafyeke, Hirschnitz-Garbers, & Ioannou, 2015). The circular economy model can be defined as "restructuring the industrial systems to support ecosystems through the adoption of methods to maximize the efficient use of resources by recycling and minimizing emissions and waste" (Preston, 2012). Accordingly, while a traditional "take-make-use-dispose" linear economy model1 relies on large quantities of cheap, easily accessible materials and energy in addition to resulting in massive waste, a circular economy model represents a development strategy that enables economic growth while optimizing the consumption of natural resources, deeply transforming production chains and consumption patterns and re-designing industrial systems2 ("Growth within: a circular economy vision for a competitive Europe", 2015). The difference between linear economy and circular economy models is shown in figure 2.

The central axis of the graph shows the linear production process which we called linear economy. The arrows indicate the possibilities for circularity with respect to the reuse and recycling of resources, waste, other materials and products. The ultimate goal is to remove the last arrow (waste) completely. Accordingly, a circular economy model goes beyond the pursuit of waste prevention and waste reduction to inspire technological, organizational, and social innovation throughout the value chain in order to "design out" waste from the beginning, rather than relying solely on waste recycling at the end of the chain ("Growth within: a circular economy vision for a competitive Europe", 2015; Rizos et. al, 2015). The system diagram in figure 3 illustrates the continuous flow of technical and biological materials through the value circle.

It is clear from the figure that the basis of the circular economy model is the remanufacturing of products through the usage of renewable energy, in particular solar power and eliminating waste as the system is designed to use waste as a resource.

There are four main principles of the circular economy model ("Growth within: a circular economy vision for a competitive Europe", 2015; Rizos et al, 2015; Stegeman, 2015):

a) Considering the reuse from the design to minimize waste. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.