Academic journal article International Journal on World Peace

In Memoriam: James R. Mancham

Academic journal article International Journal on World Peace

In Memoriam: James R. Mancham

Article excerpt

James Richard Mancham (1939-2017), Founding President of Seychelles and member of the editorial advisory board of International Journal on World Peace, passed away on January 8, 2017. He will be missed by the people of Seychelles, our editorial staff, and many others.

I first met Sir James Mancham in October 2001 in New York. It was less than a month after the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center towers and the International and Interreligious Federation for World Peace had organized a conference on Global Violence: Crisis and Hope to which we had both been invited to speak. Many of the speakers were urging the United States to refrain from the preemptive invasion of Iraq, which would violate established just war theory. Our friendship led to me publishing his book War on America Seen from the Indian Ocean through Paragon House.

Through this book, Mancham was trying to help the United States understand the effect its foreign policy was having on the rest of the world and why violent reactions like the 9/11 attack were rooted in the perception that US policy was self-serving, arbitrary, and inconsistent with the democratic ideals it promoted. Mancham viewed himself as a friend of the US, and his daughter and granddaughter live in Florida. He promoted the philosophy that "right makes might" not "might makes right," and he was trying to show readers that, while US culture promoted the former, US actions in the world seemed based on the latter.

In 2009, I helped Sir James produce, and wrote the Foreword for, his autobiography, Seychelles Global Citizen: The Autobiography of the Founding President ofthe Republic ofSeychelles. This book reveals the life of a statesman, a world citizen, and a tireless peacemaker who, despite being ousted by a military coup in 1977, forged a path of reconciliation rather than revenge for his country. Living in exile for 15 years in Europe, he excelled in business ventures, including selling private islands and managing a German airline company, and did not need to return to help rebuild Seychelles, which had severely suffered under communist rule until the Soviet Union collapsed and multi-party democracy became possible. With the blessing of Presidents Albert René, who had overthrown him, and his successor, James Michel, Mancham became a tireless promoter of Seychelles around the world, and helped to rebuild the economy through tourism and bringing in investments from the United Arab Emirates and elsewhere. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.