Academic journal article Gender Forum

Editorial

Academic journal article Gender Forum

Editorial

Article excerpt

1 In light of recent political developments on a global scale a thematic focus on women and power proves to be disturbingly topical. The massive backlash against gender equality and diversity, particularly in the United States and in Europe with a long history of women's movements, threatens to undo the achievements of past decades with regard to human rights for all.

2 Instead of Hillary Clinton's election as successor to Barack Obama as the first female after the first African American president in the U.S., Donald Trump, a declared opponent of past endeavors towards a more open and inclusive society as well as a livable planetary future carried the day. Hailed by European right-wing movements with a similar reactionary agenda, the new president's inauguration speech and his first days in office evoke frightening expectations, but have also provoked an impressive counter-movement signaled by the Women's March one day after the inauguration on a national and international level.

3 To address these current political, social and cultural developments from different disciplines we invite contributions to be published independently from the planned gender forum issues.

4 This gender forum issue assembles a number of essays on women in power from different angles: The contributions of Leah Hutton Blumenfeld and Yuwei Ge focus on the role of women and the notion of the family in American politics past and present, probing into the gendered relation between the public and the private spheres. This resonates with Anneke Ribberink's essay on the biographies of two outstanding Scandinavian feminist politicians, faced with the question of balancing career and family within a still patriarchal social framework. Marta Kelleher complements the focus on power in the political arena with her analysis of the gender bias in the public media response to transgender punk woman Laura Jane Grace.

5 Leah Hutton Blumenfeld traces the concept of republican womanhood as wife and mother in the United States and its impact on the role of women in public and political life from its beginnings to the present day. While this concept historically served to justify a political role for women as cultivators of republican values within the family, the persistence of this concept today testifies to the ongoing limitations of professional women in the political arena. Blumenfeld's historical analysis of the importance of the concept of family and its gendered role patterns can explain the gendered implications of contemporary American (party) politics, as her references to politicians from Hillary Clinton to Sarah Palin show. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.