Academic journal article Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies

Creation and Salvation in Edward Schillebeeckx. Well-Beimg as More about Jesus' Death and Less about Resurrection

Academic journal article Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies

Creation and Salvation in Edward Schillebeeckx. Well-Beimg as More about Jesus' Death and Less about Resurrection

Article excerpt

1.Introduction

As it is clearly noticeable in the first chapter of his Jesus in Our Western Culture, Schillebeeckx organizes in a special manner the basis of his future discussions about the relationship between the work of God and the ministry of Jesus as the Christ.1 References to God's work and the ministry of Jesus in creation contain the idea of a rupture or disconnection between the two works. First of all, Schillebeeckx infers that at the heart of God's work is something "completely new" which was accomplished in nature through creation. Secondly, the purpose of Jesus' ministry is established as the healing and the realization of a "new creation". Schillebeeckx vastly wrote on this concept especially in his 1977 book Christ. The Christian Experience, where he related it to the idea of suffering for others as a humble act of humanism which ensures the future of humanity (C. Simut 2010, 82; Schillebeeckx 2014a). It was meant to secure the proper realization or proper image of the created order. Schillebeeckx concludes that, though humble and obedient to God, the objective of Jesus' ministry to bring to perfection something that was created perfect already was "set against the background of the faith in God as Creator of heaven and earth" (Schillebeeckx 2014b, 121). For Schillebeeckx this is a means to stress the need to be specific about the belief in Jesus Christ on which every Christian creed stands.

This study will align Schillebeeckx's arguments on the resurrection with the traditional dogma which states that the Bible's teaching on the end-times competes with Jesus' teaching on the resurrection. This parallel came to our attention especially in connection with Schillebeeckx's idea that the resurrection established some grounds for rebuilding humanity's trust in their ancestral faith in God. These presuppositions about the relationship between resurrection and Schillebeeckx's concept of humanum or humanity in its state of well-being will help to further inspect the reliability of Schillebeeckx's ethical system for our present society.

2.Christian creeds about creation as ancestral formulas in Schillebeeckx's thought

2.1.The unity between God and Christ in human salvation

Schillebeeckx makes his way into the wide subject of creation as it springs from the Christian tradition by asserting that its creeds offer the most clear distinction between the work of God and the ministry of Jesus as the salvation of creation. One may find as a great dilemma the fact that Schillebeeckx does not confer the Apostles' Creed the importance it originally had as a "baptismal confession" (P' Schaff 1996, 16)' He rather follows the already familiar motive of creation as a mythical and universal story, a design already used as a hermeneutical motive in nowadays "provincial" African theologies (J. Gathogo 2015, 1-8). The main contrast though between these "small scale" theologies and Schillebeeckx's attempt is that the latter is not interested in the ritualistic and barbaric sort of reconnecting and reconstructing man-God relationships. Schillebeeckx's point of view is that the nature of God is best illustrated in the act of creation as disclosure of God's infinite love towards humanity. The love of God makes creation perfect, and the created order is in Schillebeeckx's words "a motion of trust in humanity and our history..., a blank cheque to which only God himself stands guarantor" (Schillebeeckx 1987, 18). It should be stated, however (McManus 1999, 476-491) that this blank cheque by which God entrusts humanity with the administration of the created order was never related to reason in Schillebeeckx, but to suffering.

Although this is an extensive attempt to reconnect creation back to its Creator, the line Schillebeeckx follows here is considered by many Church historians inappropriate as a means to explain the reasons for the appearance and development of the Christian creeds (Schaff 1996: 16). The creeds were first meant as the confession of a new church regarding doctrinal truths. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.