Academic journal article International Review of Management and Business Research

Public Service Users' Behavior, Service Satisfaction, and Citizens' Attitudes toward Budgets Cuts

Academic journal article International Review of Management and Business Research

Public Service Users' Behavior, Service Satisfaction, and Citizens' Attitudes toward Budgets Cuts

Article excerpt

Introduction

Citizens' attitudes toward service budget is undeniably one of the most concern of local governments because citizens' perceived perspective is the main determinant of supporting public projects and polices (Glaser and Denhardt 1999; Robbins et al. 2008). Local government entities must respond citizens about information request, service deficiency, local emergency and non-emergency events, public safety issues, matters related to public programs, and a host of other topics in an effective operation of public agencies (Jung et al. 2015). Unlike most business entities, public service consumer's attitudes toward service providers include more complicated issues and limitations, such as budget constraints and public regulations. Moreover, given the declining citizen satisfaction with public services and programs as well as the decreasing trust in government (Berman 1997; Morgeson et al. 2010), mny public administration scholars have suggested that governments would enhance service performance in order to obtain citizens' continuous support for the operation of public programs and polices (Higgins 2005; Thomas 2012; Andrews and Van de Walle 2013 ; Wu and Jung 2016; Wu 2017). On the other hand, when citizens have positive views of political institutions, they may have a higher moral obligation to pay taxes and positive perspectives to government (Torgler and Schneider 2007).

Current literature has demonstrated that citizen satisfaction with public services is a positive determinant of citizens' willingness to support service budget (Benton and Daly 1992; Hansen 1998; Duncombe et al. 2003). If citizens perceive high performance on specific public services, they will be more willing to support public budgets related to those services. Although a large body of study emphasized the function and effect of citizens' opinions on policy-making processes and citizen-government relations (Callahan and Holzer 1999; Zhang and Yang 2009), these works did not pay much attention to how the usage experience of public services significantly influences public service consumers' attitudes toward a specific service budget.

Some researchers attempt to examine the relationship between usage experience of public services and citizens' opinion and suggest that citizens with positive usage experience of public services would translate this experience positively to their willingness to support public budget (Robbins et al. 2008; Collins and Kim 2009). It is, however, still unclear that whether frequent users of public services are more likely to support service budget or not. Frequent users of public services are those who frequently consume the selected public service in a given period of time. For consumer-oriented services, the frequent usage of public services provides local officials an important clue informing local governments to maintain service performance and to understand citizens' perception of the selected services that they use most frequently.

In this context, the focus of this study is on the usage experience of public service consumers and its relationship with citizens' attitudes toward service budget. This study moves step forward and attempts to investigate the effect of the frequent usage of public services on citizens' budget attitudes. The purpose of this study is to test the theory that frequent users of public services are more likely to support public budgets. The main independent variables include citizen satisfaction with public transportation and the frequency of using specific public transportation service. The dependent variable is support for public budgets related to public transportation . However, the effect of satisfaction with these services on attitudes toward service budget is indirect and mediated by the frequency of using public services. To test this argument, the data used in this study was drawn from 2003 citizen survey of City of San Francisco.

Hypotheses and Literature Review

Citizen Satisfaction with Public Services and Frequency of Using Public Services

Researchers have argued that there is a positive relationship between service outputs (i. …

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