Academic journal article Researchers World

Influence of Age Difference in Response to Motor Skill Training on the Performance of Activities of Daily Living by Pupils with Cerebral Palsy in Kisumu Kenya

Academic journal article Researchers World

Influence of Age Difference in Response to Motor Skill Training on the Performance of Activities of Daily Living by Pupils with Cerebral Palsy in Kisumu Kenya

Article excerpt

INTRODUCTION:

Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a condition that restricts an individual's ability from independent living. Individuals with cerebral palsy are unable to perform precise movements of both fine and gross motor muscles required for self care activities such as dressing, toileting, feeding, cleaning amoung others. For individuals with cerebral palsy, self care abilities can be improved through training. This study evaluated the influence of age on response to motor skills training on the performance of activities of daily living by learners with cerebral palsy.

According to (Olaf, et al., 2009), younger children with cerebral palsy respond faster to exercise on the performance of activities of daily living than adults.

(Sekuler, Bennet, & Mamelak, 2005) observed that practice improved performance for both younger and older subjects. However, (Livingston, Stewart, Rosenbaum, & Russel, 2011) revealed that in South Africa, youths with severe physical disabilities have more difficulty performing cognitive skills than self-care skills when compared with younger ones. The study further revealed that most youths with severe physical challenges mastered the skills of activities of daily living even though with a lot of difficulties as compared to younger children with physical challenges. Younger children, more so those with disabilities enjoy self care activities being done for them. The difference between children with physical disabilities and those with Cerebral Palsy is that those with CP have unhealthy brain which may also detorroriate with age, it might therefore not be the age but the state of health of the brain when it comes to the abilities of learning the skills of daily living. In some cases older pupil can learn faster than younger learners and at times it can be vice -versa.

LITERATURE REVIEW:

(Fisher, 2010) studied cardio respiratory responses to exercise in children and adults in America. The study findings noted that maximum heart rate is a function of age, and children have very high maximal heart rates. Blood flow to working muscles is higher during exercise in children, this may partially compensate for the lower cardiac output. In contrast, during exercise, skeletal muscle oxygen extraction and muscle oxidative capacity are similar in the children and adults. Children require higher minute ventilation at any given oxygen consumption. The reason is the higher respiratory rate and shallower breathing in children. The study further found that respiratory muscles of children must work harder during exercise than those of adults. These differences in the cardio-vascular and respiratory system responses to exercise limit oxygen delivery to working muscles, resulting in a lower endurance exercise capacity in children. This does not mean that children cannot perform endurance exercises or improve endurance exercise capacity; rather it means that children cannot be expected to perform endurance exercises, or train for endurance events at the same level as adults. The study recommends exercise prescription for children which should approximately follow the general recommendations for enhancing motor skill functioning in children with physical disabilities. The reviewed study was done with children and adults with respiratory problems and not with children with cerebral palsy as it is in the present study.

(Olaf, et al., 2009) conducted a study on the Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) among children with cerebral palsy in Europe. The study revealed that younger children with cerebral palsy responded faster to exercise on the performance of activities of daily living than adults.

(Sekuler, Bennet, & Mamelak, 2005) carried out a study on age-related learning differences in USA. The study assessed how divided attention costs varied when initial performance levels were equated across the age groups at the start of practice. The result was that practice improved performance for both young and older subjects. …

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