Academic journal article British Journal of Canadian Studies

Conflicting Visions: Canada and India in the Cold War World, 1946-76

Academic journal article British Journal of Canadian Studies

Conflicting Visions: Canada and India in the Cold War World, 1946-76

Article excerpt

Ryan Touhey, Conflicting Visions: Canada and India in the Cold War World, 1946-76 (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2015), 320 pp. Cased. $95. ISBN 978-0-7748-2900-7. Paper. $34.95. ISBN 978-0-7748-2901-4.

As one who has used the cliché several times myself, it is now becoming trite to point out that historians of Canada's international relations have begun to look beyond the North Atlantic, and, in breaking out of this traditional ground, they have reached new conclusions about the nature of Canadian foreign policy. Those more traditionally minded historians, interested in Canada's relationships with Britain and with the United States, had concentrated largely on questions of Canadian autonomy and independence, as well as on the matter of the extent of Canada's influence with its great power guarantors. These issues are still relevant to the new scholarship. But in looking at Canadian relations with the non-western world, particularly in the period after the wave of post-1945 decolonisation, historians such as David Webster, Kevin Spooner, and Robin Gendron have posed other questions about Canada's engagement with the world. Often, they have drawn troubling conclusions, especially once cultural factors and economic power have been thrown into the mix. Canada, these scholars have reminded us, is a western country, with policymakers who thought in western terms. The point is worth stressing because many Canadians had - and have - seemingly bought too much into the rhetoric that Canada is a nation of mild-mannered, tolerant 'honest brokers'.

Yet as Ryan Touhey stresses in Conflicting Visions - perhaps the best of this superb new crop of historical work on Canada's international relations - Canadians took seriously the notion that they could act as a bridge between the west and the rest. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.