Academic journal article Medium Aevum

The Works of a Lollard Preacher: The Sermon 'Omnis Plantacio', the Tract 'Fundamentum Aliud Nemo Potest Ponere', and the Tract 'De Oblacione Iugis Sacrificii'

Academic journal article Medium Aevum

The Works of a Lollard Preacher: The Sermon 'Omnis Plantacio', the Tract 'Fundamentum Aliud Nemo Potest Ponere', and the Tract 'De Oblacione Iugis Sacrificii'

Article excerpt

The Works of a Lollard Preacher: The Sermon 'Omnis plantacio', the Tract 'Fundamentum aliud nemo potest ponere', and the Tract 'De oblacione iugis sacrificii', ed. Anne Hudson, EETS, os 317 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001). lxxiv + 397 pp.; 5 plates. ISBN 0-19-722320-6. L45.00.

Anne Hudson's latest edition is a companion volume to her Two Wycliffite Texts published as EETS, 0s 301 in 1993. All texts in both volumes date from the early fifteenth century, and thus give evidence of Lollard responses to persecution. The sermon Omnis plantacio and the tract De oblacione in the present volume may be presumed, by their references to it, to postdate Arundel's Constitutions (although Fundamentum aliud may probably be dated before 1407 on the same grounds). Thus, the texts in the new volume in particular help (like their close contemporary the Lanterne of Lizt) to show that the Constitutions, while not without impact, certainly did not bring the composition and dissemination of Lollard works to an end.

Also of interest are the distinctive idiom and pedagogic stance employed by the author of (probably) all the texts in this new volume. Throughout, the writer makes efforts to engage with a projected audience of keen yet unschooled learners, an approach perhaps best exemplified by the already frequently quoted passage near the end of Omnis plantacio (see 138/2939-139/2962) in which the writer promises to leave a written copy of his sermon with the listening audience, encouraging them to read it and promising replies to any corrections or counter-arguments by adversaries they may report on his next visit. The writer revels in the possibilities of vernacular style, making extensive use of rhyme, alliteration, and the earthier possibilities of invective, e.g.: 'sacrefice to stokkis and stones and worme-eten bonys, to the swerdis poynt and water, to olde raggis and may o[thorn]ur [thorn]inggis [thorn]at ben callid imagis' (231/2904-6).. Yet his writings also incorporate words and passages in Latin, in a manner that seems designed to make that Latin accessible even to readers without formal education (see e. …

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