Academic journal article The Virginia Quarterly Review

Recreating the American Republic: Rules of Apportionment, Constitutional Change, and American Political Development

Academic journal article The Virginia Quarterly Review

Recreating the American Republic: Rules of Apportionment, Constitutional Change, and American Political Development

Article excerpt

Recreating the American Republic: Rides of Apportionment, Constitutional Change, and American Political Development, by Charles A. Kromkowski.

The most critical problem of representative government is how the public can hold their representatives accountable. Kromkowski sheds light on the relationship between representatives and their constituents by examining the dramatic and complex story of apportionment during three critical periods of American history: the Revolution, the Constitutinal Convention, and the Civil War. Most scholarship on apportionment centers on the landmark Supreme Court decisions of the 1960s that established the "one person, one vote" rule. This book probes the deep philosophical and historical roots of apportionment decisions, revealing that the rules of power that shape representation cannot be settled by judicial decrees; rather, they follow from social and political disruption, institutional change, and intrepid public deliberation. Skillfully combining detailed historical narrative and rigorous social science theory, the author shows how American democracy was born of, and developed from, a combination of brilliant statecraft and enlightened self-interest. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.