Academic journal article The Virginia Quarterly Review

Storm of Steel: The Development of Armor Doctrine in Germany and the Soviet Union, 1919-1939

Academic journal article The Virginia Quarterly Review

Storm of Steel: The Development of Armor Doctrine in Germany and the Soviet Union, 1919-1939

Article excerpt

Storm of Steel: The Development of Armor Doctrine in Germany and the Soviet Union, 1919-1939, by Mary R. Habeck.

Among the most perplexing questions in the scholarship on the sources of military doctrine in general, and the development of armor doctrine in particular, concerns the peculiar development of German and Soviet operational level doctrine prior to World War II. The invasion of the Soviet Union by Hitler's Germany in the summer of 1941 is fascinating not only because it marked the opening of the second front of the war, but also because of its initially lopsided result in Germany's favor. Among the few reasons for the devastating nature of the attack was the significant operational superiority enjoyed by the Germans in the form of the blitzkrieg doctrine. Yet, as Mary Habeck notes, it was the Soviet Union which only five years earlier possessed the most advanced armor doctrine in the world. How the two states developed similar doctrines during the interwar period, why the Soviets eschewed such a valuable innovation, and why and how the Germans took the lead in doctrinal theory and practice are the questions that Storms of Steel addresses. …

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