Academic journal article et Cetera

Technostress: Coping with Technology @ Work @ Home @ Play

Academic journal article et Cetera

Technostress: Coping with Technology @ Work @ Home @ Play

Article excerpt

Michelle M. Weil and Larry D. Rosen. Technostress. Coping with Technology@ Work @Home @Play. New York: Wiley, 1997.

Psychologist Michelle Weil and educator Larry Rosen set out to explain why technology makes people feel stressed out and what can be done to preserve one's humanity and sanity in an increasingly digital world.

The book begins with a chapter, titled "How Technostressed Are You?", which categorizes people's reactions to technology with three "Technotypes": Eager Adopters, Hesitant "Prove Its," and Resisters. You may already have a good idea of which label describes you best. Chances are you belong in one of the latter two categories, since only about 10 to 15 percent of us are Eager Adopters. The fact of the matter, say the authors, is that the vast majority of us are not eager, excited, and amazed by technology but are rather uncomfortable, frustrated, and uncertain about much of it. And some folks, such as members of a national organization called the "Lead Pencil Club," proudly proclaim a Luddite defiance of technology.

But most of us are not Luddites and realize that it is probably a good idea to learn how to use technology effectively at home and at work (for more and more people, technology has actually made it possible to stay at home and work). In order to facilitate that learning, and to empower the learner by dispelling fears about becoming dependent on technology, Weil and Rosen propose an "Independent Worker's Technology Bill of Rights," that aims to put technology's role in life in its proper perspective. …

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