Academic journal article Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal

Personality of University Teachers According to the Defense Mechanism Technique Modified (DMTm) as Related to Their Assessment of Their University as an Organizational Setting

Academic journal article Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal

Personality of University Teachers According to the Defense Mechanism Technique Modified (DMTm) as Related to Their Assessment of Their University as an Organizational Setting

Article excerpt

The present study considers possible relations between personality and organizational-assessment variables. Subjects in a stratified sample of 114 university teachers, 36 women and 78 men, were examined using the Defense Mechanism Technique mod(fied (DMT-), a percept genetic technique. They also made assessments of their university as an organization. Two data sets were formed initially, the one consisting of 18 DMTm variables and the other of these variables together with gender. In total, 34 factor analyses were performed, each involving the inclusion, together with the data set in question, of a different one of the 17 organizational variables which were employed. Affect anxiety (DMTm) was found in factors together with ratings of the organizational variables of openness/diversity, developmental orientation, planning/clarity, workload pressure (negative sign), personal attitude toward the superior, change-centeredness of the superior and organizational climate. Identity anxiety (DMTm) was found in a factor together with organizational climate (negative sign); repression 3 (DMTm) in a factor together with academic values, human orientation and formalization/centralization (negative sign); projected introaggression (DMTm) in a factor together with employee-centeredness of the superior (negative sign); and denial through reversal III (DMTfm) in a factor together with structural orientation, formalization/centralization and sufficiency of resources (negative sign). The results were found to be interpretable in terms of the Andersson model of the mind and to support the usefulness of the type of data treatment employed.

The basic question considered in the present paper is whether relationships exist between personality characteristics of university teachers and their views concerning their university as an organization. One of us (Ryhammar, 1996) found, in a recent study published in Swedish, support for the existence of such relationships. A factor-analytic approach was employed in which a series of factor analyses was carried out involving use of different sets of data containing both personality and organizational variables.

The initial step taken yielded results which appeared less than encouraging rather low intercorrelations (at most around 0.30) being obtained between personality variables and the subjects' assessments of their university as an organization. There were 17 organizational-assessment variables and, of the personality variables, 18 were obtained from the Defense Mechanism Technique modified (DMTm), a percept-genetic technique (Kragh & Smith, 1970; Andersson, 1991; Andersson & Ryhammar, 1998).

A factor analysis of these 35 variables as measured in 114 individuals yielded 13 factors, yet only one of these included both types of data, namely a factor including two organizational variables, structural orientation and formalization/ centralization, and one personality variable, denial through reversal III. When gender was added to the data set, 13 factors again appeared, but none of these included both personality and organizational variables, although one of the factors contained a personality variable, denial through reversal III, together with gender. Considered thus far, it appeared that personality, defined here as the occurrence or non-occurrence of various forms of anxiety and defense against anxiety in the DMTm, had little in common with organizational assessment. The idea, however, that some sort of relationship between these two kinds of variables might indeed exist led, then, to quite a different strategy for handling the data being explored.

A basic problem involved was the fact that when the intercorrelations between two domains of variables are lower than the intercorrelations within the domains, a factor analysis is less likely to yield factors which include variables from both domains. In a study involving this same problem, Claesson & Olsson (1995) attempted to circumvent this by first factor analysing variables from one area, that of self-rated coping, to obtain a limited number of factors, and then performing a set of further factor analyses, each involving the inclusion together with the coping variables of a single percept-genetic variable or a set of such variables, most of them derived from the DMTm. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.