Academic journal article Anglican Theological Review

Introduction

Academic journal article Anglican Theological Review

Introduction

Article excerpt

We Christian people are always called to think and to pray about our own lives and about the world in which we live, especially, of course, when we are faced with challenges and opportunities which call us to understand ourselves and our relationship to God in new and, perhaps, threatening ways. There have been many such times in the past when discoveries and advances in human knowledge have called our long-held beliefs and values into question. Now, perhaps even more than in the past, scientific advances in the field of genetics are raising questions about the nature of human nature and the nature of God, as well as about the moral and pastoral implications of genetic engineering and manipulation. Because such advances concern the beliefs and values of Christian people and indeed of all human beings, it is important that those of us who believe in God as the One who creates, redeems, and sanctifies human life should think and pray about what those advances may mean and how we should deal with them.

In June of this year in cooperation with the Anglican Theological Review and the College of Preachers I gathered together a group of Episcopalians-theologians, ethicists, scientists, and people involved in pastoral care-in order to begin to explore what those advances might mean, by thinking about them and by praying for understanding and guidance. …

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